Lisa Lindvay: 2017 Women in Photography (WIPNYC) Grant short-list

 

I began making photographs of my father, two brothers and sister ten years ago when I moved away from my family for the first time to attend graduate school. My mother has always struggled with her mental health, in 2006 she sunk into a deep depression causing our family to unravel. For almost three years my mother was a ghost of herself, often locked in her bedroom not to be bothered. Unable to care for herself or all three of my siblings, my father took guardianship of my brothers, who are not his biological children, while my sister stayed with my mother and stepfather. This entropic period changed everything from our financial stability to our physical and mental health and understanding of ourselves. I felt an urgency to be at home - making photographs is my way of understanding the complexities of our situation.

The photographs are glimpses into the lives of my family members and our homes, of the private moments shared between my father, sister, brothers, and myself in the wake of my my mother’s deteriorating mental health. They depict our history and provide insight into our future. The photographs reveal our tenacity as we come to terms with our shifting family dynamic and home life and as my siblings transition into adulthood, while my father struggles to hold everything together.

In a wider context, my photographs are a portrayal of the inner workings of the American family navigating its way through instability, financial adversity, and the growing pains of adolescence. While my story is specific, the themes resonate across diverse cultural and economic lines.

Bio
Lisa Lindvay was born in 1983 in Erie, PA and currently resides in Chicago, IL. She earned her MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago (2009) and BFA in Applied Media Arts from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania (2006). Lindvay’s photographs have been exhibited in Chicago at Aspect/Ratio Projects, Johalla Projects, Weinberg/Newton, Hyde Park Art Center; nationally at Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, Washington (DC); Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover (MA); Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro (NC); and Internationally at Turner Contemporary, Margate (ENG); among others. She is the recipient of the 3Arts Artist Award (2011) and Chicago Artadia Award (2012). See more at lisalindvy.com.

Cristina Velásquez: 2017 Women in Photography (WIPNYC) Grant short-list

 

Montañera
My recent work is motivated by my interest in photography as a way to push documentary conventions into the realm of pictorial depiction. Starting from observations of the human experience and life in my country, I reinterpret reality using elements of fiction and artifice to animate underlying power structures, confound assumptions, and question conventions. I am interested in borrowing narrative structures from Latin American literature, while at the same time questioning the very nature of narration and representation. Who is the narrator? Who is the reader? What is, and what is not part of the narrative?

Constructed photographs, formal portraits, and purely documentary still lifes, present an experimental counterpoint with the intention of transforming the way the reader generates meaning. Each image is embedded with its own logic of confrontation or avoidance. I believe there is a power in asking people to respond to images that might reroute what they think they know, or reveal something about their own misinformation.


Bio
Cristina Velásquez (Colombia) is an artist working mainly in photography and paper weavings. Her recent work investigates the role of representation and translation in the context of transcultural relationships. She is interested in the way cultural identity is constructed, defining shared notions of value, such as, race, beauty and class. Cristina received an MFA degree in Advanced Photographic Studies from Bard College and The International Center of Photography (New York, 2017), where she was awarded the ICP Director’s Scholarship. Velásquez currently lives and works in New York. cristinavelasquez.com

Carmen Winant

 

Before giving birth, I had dreams that I had no bones in my body; I had dreams that my child was boneless. I dreamt of stacking warm babies into piles, racing to get the balance just right before I lost total daylight. I dreamt of earthquakes, which is, incidentally, exactly what birth is like: the material world momentarily shudders and opens wide to unknown and possibly devastating effect. Writing about birth is impossible because it has been determined too sentimental by a culture that undervalues female experience, and also because it is impossible to transmute a feeling so large into art. What if I tried to find a new vocabulary for it? What if I piled up mothers, unseen, under moonlight? What if I removed all of the bones from the picture? How can I put it: tenderness and resentment took turns eclipsing one another to near totality. Time passed vertically rather than horizontally, no longer broken up between day and night, but minutes and eternities. The body -- my body! -- once intact, came undone and labored its pieces back together in a new configuration. I am two months away from giving birth for the second time in three years, and I trust that pictures will both guide and fail me.

Bio
Carmen Winant is an artist and writer. Her work will be featured in Being: New Photography 2018 at the Museum of Modern Art; My Birth, an artist book with SPBH Editions, will be published concurrently. carmenwinant.com

Susan Lipper

 

Grapevine
The series takes its name from Grapevine Branch, West Virginia, a small community where Lipper took up intermittent residency for four years. In time she became an inside member of this closed community and developed intimate relationships with the residents, whom she interviewed and photographed with a medium-format camera. Although Lipper’s images seem to be constructed within the established vocabulary of documentary photography, she broke from this tradition by granting her sitters the theatrical license to perform as actors—as versions of themselves that may or may not have been true. After developing her prints, Lipper reviewed them with her sitters so they could refine or alter their poses. The resulting collaborative process paradoxically fulfills a traditional documentary function by throwing the gender and class roles enacted in small-town America into greater relief and asking viewers to recall the images of rural American communities we hold in our collective visual memory. In Lipper’s photographs, each role, whether inhabited or performed, reveals itself to be artifice or fantasy as much as a means of personal expression. In this way, Grapevine enacts a double manifestation of self, picturing both Lipper’s own psychic imagination—her creation and exploration of a fictional eden removed from the reach of empty consumerism—and her subjects’ keen self-awareness of in their posturing.

All images courtesy of the Artist and Higher Pictures

Bio
Susan Lipper is a New York based artist. She received her MFA from Yale University in 1983. Among the monographs on her work are Bed and Breakfast, 2000; trip, 1999; and GRAPEVINE, 1994. Lipper is represented, amongst other places, in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and most recently the 2015 Guggenheim Fellowship. susanlipper.com

Ilona Szwarc

 

"I am a woman and I feast on memory."
Ilona Szwarc is dissecting the process of becoming: how an individual assimilates and makes oneself imperceptible in society while engaging a series of internal and external transformations.

Each part of the triptych, consisting of 23 sequential portraits, takes the form of stage makeup tutorials. By employing look-alikes, women who share her general appearance, the artist is placing herself at once as the subject and the object in the photographs. In this step-by-step process she is manipulating her own image through a proxy: her American doppelganger.

These carefully staged photographs confuse the relationship between a portrait or a self-portrait. Szwarc is directing a compelling narrative, in which through cinematic closeups of her painting and drawing on the model’s face, she first creates an uncanny portrait of an aged woman, then through abstract and colorful mark-making she transforms her into a large woman. The series culminates with an androgynous, grotesque, saintly mask, a contemporary Vera Icon of her doppelganger.

Bio
Ilona Szwarc (American and Polish) is a photographer based in Los Angeles, California.

Szwarc received an MFA in Photography from Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and a BFA from School of Visual Arts in New York City. She has had solo exhibitions at Foley Gallery in New York City, Claude Samuel in Paris, France, Amerika Haus in Munich, Germany, Leica Gallery in Warsaw, Poland and Maison de la Photographie in Lille, France. Her work has been shown in group shows internationally and most recently at Regen Projects in Los Angeles, Danziger Gallery in New York and at the International Festival for Photography and Fashion in Hyeres, France.

Szwarc has been awarded Richard Benson Prize for Excellence in Photography (2015), Arnold Newman Prize for New Directions in Photographic Portraiture (2014), World Press Photo (2013) and most recently chosen as FOAM Talent. ilonaszwarc.com

Carrie Mae Weems

 

Kitchen Table Series
This body of work was inspired in part by the influential essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” (1975) by the critic Laura Mulvey, which addressed the lack of nonobjectified representations of women in film and other cultural expressions.  Like Family Pictures and Stories, the series offers a valid portrait of an often overlooked subject, in this case, a modern black woman, “the other of the other.”  The images trace a period in the woman’s life as she experiences the blossoming, then loss, of love, the responsibilities of motherhood, and the desire to be an engaged and contributing member of her community.  The protagonist is Weems herself – a practice that will continue throughout the next decades of her career.  The role of words has become more prominent with fourteen stand-alone text panels that relay the at times rocky narrative.  Near the end, the woman stands alone, strong and self-reliant, looking directly at the viewer, her arms squarely planted on her kitchen table, where the entire story has unfolded under a light of interrogation.  Although Kitchen Table Series depicts a black subject and is loosely related to her own experiences, Weems strives for it to reflect the experiences of Everywoman and to resonate across racial and class boundaries.

All images ©Carrie Mae Weems.  Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Bio
Considered one of the most influential contemporary American artists, Carrie Mae Weems has investigated yearning, loss, cultural identity, and the visual consequences of power throughout her world-renowned career.  Determined as ever to enter the picture—both literally and metaphorically—Weems has sustained an on-going dialogue within contemporary discourse for more than twenty-five years.  carriemaeweems.net

Whitney Hubbs

 

Body Doubles
Looking at pictures of women, as seen pulled back toward my eye, I see myself withthem. I can’t help it. I parse their bodies, the forms. Not my own and yet familiar.

When I’m in front of the camera, my body is being looked at, is being performed, is being directed and recorded. It is being taken apart and pieced back together.

We repeat and repeat, the same scene, against the same wall, with the same lights. We write the body on a piece of film. Film that’s been pushed and prodded, mishandled and flipped. At a certain point I had to accept a bodily experience. It was pleasurable to look at their rough unpolished states, the bodies simply are: flipping, posing, being coy, arms as arrows, feet as poles, the lens as lover and mirror, the lens always looking back and being looked at, not by the face, but by the breasts, buttocks, heels, toes, shins, spines and throats, unhurried and happy to give that which can’t be taken.

Bio
Whitney Hubbs (b. 1977, Los Angeles) received her BFA from California College of the Arts and her MFA from UCLA. She is represented by M+B Gallery.  whitneyhubbs.com

Oraib Toukan

 


Painless May, June cut to the heart
Curated by Regina Mamou

Oraib Toukan’s Painless May, June cut to the heart (2011) is an ongoing project that re-presents photographs depicting a couple’s travels throughout various locations in Europe from 1967 to 1970. The selected images, a collection of amateur Kodak snapshots belonging to Toukan’s family, situate the viewer in seemingly apolitical scenes of repose. The paradox of the situation manifests itself in the observation of dates printed on the images’ borders and the recognizable tourist locations that correspond to the period of rioting across Europe during the late 1960s.

Painless May, June cut to the heart, whose title is taken from the opening scene of Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Petit Soldat (1960), occupies both a purposeful and mundane space that unfolds in the sequencing of the main characters. Through the reproduction and reassembly of the collection, Toukan draws attention to the dates by allowing them to serve as signifiers for the viewer, weighting the images in a specific historical framework. Her interest in presenting the repetitive act of picture-taking at the convergence of insurrectionary and touristic moments draws back an invisible curtain to reveal issues of mobility, class, and ideology.

As an artist who was raised in Amman, Jordan and is currently based in New York City, Toukan regularly travels between the United States and the Middle East. There is an easy analogy that can be made between Toukan’s work and the current events of the Arab Spring and global protests of 2011. But, Toukan is careful to explain that “politics is not this separate exotic other . . . the year of 2011 has finally proven that the project of studying ‘the political’ as separate from the aesthetic object [is] a banal one.” As she combed through her archive she found images taken by the couple in Europe depicting ancient ruins while elsewhere sections of the city were burning in uprisings. She continued, “I was specifically interested in how the dates sway the images into a . . . historic period that is the antithesis of the images.” Toukan added that this kind of disaffirmation of a revolutionary experience is “like watching Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959) and responding, ‘You saw nothing in Hiroshima. Nothing.’”

All images are Untitled from the series Painless May, June cut to the heart(2011).

Bio
Oraib Toukan works across media in a process she likes to term ‘mimicry-as-method.’ Participation, appropriation, referentiality, and institutional interventions under the radar are typical of her practice. Recent exhibitions include the Hordaland Kunstsenter Bergen (2011), NGBK/Kunstraum Bethanien Berlin (2010), the Serpentine Gallery Map Marathon (2010), the Irish Museum of Contemporary Art (2010), Iniva London (2010), and the 11th Istanbul Biennial (2009). With a background in photography, Toukan has an MFA (interdisciplinary) from Bard College as well as an MA in systems thinking from the University of London. Oraib was raised in Jordan, is based in New York, and teaches in Palestine at Bard College and the International Academy of Art. website 

Regina Mamou is a Chicago-based visual artist and independent curator and writer. She holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design. She received a Fulbright Fellowship to Jordan (2009–2010), and has recently exhibited her work at Action Field Kodra 11th Exhibition of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki, Greece (2011) and Makan Art Space, Amman, Jordan (2010). Curatorial projects include Remember Then: An Exhibition on the Photography of Memorythat Mamou co-curated with Scott Patrick Wiener at Harvard University’s Center for Government and International Studies (2011). She has also served as a contributor for ArtAsiaPacific magazine’s Almanac edition. Mamou is currently an adjunct lecturer in the Art Institute of Chicago’s Department of Museum Education. website

Yola Monakhov

 
  Prussian Night, 2012

Prussian Night, 2012


Living Pictures
The work takes its name from 19th century tableaux vivants, which staged living scenes suspended in time. But rather than freezing life into image, I pursue the impossibility of unfrozen life. Through collaborations with scientists, ecologists, growers, and other naturalists, I bring studio setups into the living environment. I engage the near absurdity of this process, and confront, through photographs, both ineffable subject and my own agency.

Referencing the contact-printed albums of Anna Atkins and illustrations of John James Audubon, this work originated with plant life and horticulture motifs, and grew to encompass birds, river systems, and landscapes. I employ techniques of still life, genre drawing, sculpture, stroboscopic photography, and Land art, and reveal the analogic fingerprints of my interventions, visible accessories, imperfections, and light leaks.

I am particularly moved by the asymmetric relationship the photographs bear to their subjects: the subjects don’t reciprocate, and might rather avoid, the interest of the photographer. The pictures address the viewer’s desire for presence, experience, knowledge, and mastery over his environment, along with the limits of representation, and the subject itself, in fulfilling this desire.

  Elizabeth Bishop, Louise Crane, 2012

Elizabeth Bishop, Louise Crane, 2012

  An ongoing text, 2010-2011

An ongoing text, 2010-2011

  Mantle, 2011

Mantle, 2011

  The Essence of Man, 2011

The Essence of Man, 2011

  The most general fact, 2012

The most general fact, 2012

  Of how terrible orange is, 2010

Of how terrible orange is, 2010

  "But not yet", 2012

"But not yet", 2012

  But not for you, my love, 2011

But not for you, my love, 2011

  Interval, 2010

Interval, 2010

  Theory of Dreams, 2010-2011

Theory of Dreams, 2010-2011

  Blue China, 2011

Blue China, 2011

  Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, 2012

Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, 2012

  Unnameable, 2011

Unnameable, 2011

  A bright red sloop in the harbor, 2011

A bright red sloop in the harbor, 2011

  Useful and Entertaining Knowledge, 2011

Useful and Entertaining Knowledge, 2011

Bio
Yola Monakhov makes work that deals with the materiality and textuality of images. Solo exhibitions include “Photography After Dante” and “Once Out of Nature” at the Sasha Wolf Gallery and “Lebende Bilder (I)” at Old Dominion University’s Gordon Art Galleries. Awards include a Meredith S. Moody fellowship from Yaddo, and Fellowship from Greve in Chianti (FI) / Macina di San Cresci. She has been a contributing photographer for The New Yorkermagazine since 2006, and her work has appeared in EsquireTimeNewsweek,The New York Times, and Harper’s. She received her MFA in visual arts and MA in Italian literature from Columbia University, and is currently Harnish Visiting Artist at Smith College, and faculty at the International Center of Photography. She was born in Moscow, Russia, and lives and works in Northampton, MA, and New York City. website 

Sarah Palmer

 
  Gulls the first sign of land, 2010

Gulls the first sign of land, 2010


As A Real House
As A Real House, a series which has been evolving over several years, examines dark corners of remembrance, identity, and invention. Exploring my futile attempt to study time by stopping it mid-decay, I look at the medium of photography and my own desire through a prism, breaking each apart into their elements. This work traces my search for the possible and impossible within photography, my desire to understand how ideas and memories are trapped inside, like fossils in rock. Investigating constructions, still lives and found objects, I hope to reveal the vulnerability of both subject and medium, exposing all bodies as written texts, and to catalog photography’s viscera through intentionality and accident, drawing its hushed footsteps along the boundary of the real and the invented, the immediate and the hidden, the desirable and the grotesque.

The series comprises various explorations of image-making and multiple genres – within this, the images range from the seemingly straight to the experimental. The possible disjointedness of these studies is purposeful: it is my hope that the viewer question the connections and possible contradictions within the body of work as I present it. As A Real House asks questions but does not necessarily provide answers. The work itself is rooted in metaphor, meant to be interrogated, as one would read a poem. Herein, one can view desires both personal and universal, as well as uncertainties and doubts about femininity and identity.

  Doppelg?nger (Kingston), 2011

Doppelg?nger (Kingston), 2011

  The N of All Equations, 2009

The N of All Equations, 2009

  A Ruled Surface, 2009

A Ruled Surface, 2009

  She (200 Pieces), 2011

She (200 Pieces), 2011

  Birth of the World, 2009

Birth of the World, 2009

  Renaissance, 2009

Renaissance, 2009

  Arrow (side configuration), 2009

Arrow (side configuration), 2009

  Six Deciduous Trees, 2010

Six Deciduous Trees, 2010

  Post-Post Etiquette, 2009

Post-Post Etiquette, 2009

  Echo/When I Think of the Place, 2010

Echo/When I Think of the Place, 2010

  Black Cat/White Cat, 2010

Black Cat/White Cat, 2010

Bio
Sarah Palmer was born in 1977 in San Francisco, and lives in Brooklyn. She received her MFA in Photography from School of Visual Arts in 2008, where she was awarded an Aaron Siskind Scholarship, and her BA from Vassar College in 1999. Her work has been exhibited at the Center for Photography at Woodstock, the Irish Museum of Contemporary Art, Like the Spice Gallery, Affirmation Arts, in exhibitions at the New York Photo Festival in 2009 and 2011, and most recently at Foam_fotografiemuseum, Amsterdam, in summer 2011, among other galleries and pop-up spaces. She has been published in print and online journals and exhibition catalogs, and recently contributed an essay and visual dialogue to Foams Whats Next project. Her first solo exhibition was held at the Wild Project in New York City in Spring 2010. Additionally, she has worked with Rooftop Films, a film festival and production collective, since 2001, and is now on its Board of Directors. She is currently full-time faculty in the Photography program at Parsons The New School for Design. website

Pamela Pecchio

 
  These Arms are Snakes, 2010

These Arms are Snakes, 2010


On Longing, Distance and Heavy Metal
I recently rekindled my romance with heavy metal during a three-year period where my home and professional lives existed in two separate cities. The weekly three and a half hour drive between the two was torturous. I was divided between two priorities, my career and my relationship. Metal provided refuge for my angst and frustration; it can make time pass for me like no other kind of music.

Through that filter of distress and restlessness, I connected with the North Carolina and Virginia landscape I was passing through. I saw in it an energy similar to my own. Engaging in a longstanding conversation between visual art and music, the photographs in On Longing, Distance and Heavy Metal, represent that energy. Made at dawn and dusk with a large format view camera, the photographs are complex and dissonant, sometimes barren, sometimes lovely, and densely layered like both heavy metal and my internal state. I have drawn upon the history of landscape photography to project my psychological condition onto the natural world. My goal is to evoke in the viewer a response to the work that is equivalent to the response I had to my surroundings.

My favorite metal takes the listener on a journey. The progression of sound is not necessarily predictable, it builds on a solid foundation, and layers instruments, voices and energy. It is complicated, often unbalanced, dense, and shares a story. A dedicated listener is enveloped by the sound, temporarily held inside the tangled web it creates. As I drive through the landscape of Virginia and North Carolina, I look for photographs that will hold the viewer in that same space.

  Hide the Sun, 2010

Hide the Sun, 2010

  On Longing, 2009

On Longing, 2009

  To Build a Nest, 2009

To Build a Nest, 2009

  Into the Fog, 2010

Into the Fog, 2010

  Up Against, 2009

Up Against, 2009

  Rainbow in the Dark, 2010

Rainbow in the Dark, 2010

  Behind the Wall of Sleep, 2010

Behind the Wall of Sleep, 2010

  The Prisoner, 2008

The Prisoner, 2008

  Lost in the Ozone, Broken and Alone, 2009

Lost in the Ozone, Broken and Alone, 2009

Bio
Pamela Pecchio was born in Massachusetts in 1974, but was raised in Atlanta, Georgia, where she moved as an infant. She received her MFA in Photography from the Yale University School of Art in 2001, where she was awarded the Richard Dixon Welling Prize for Excellence, and her BFA from the University of Georgia in 1998. Her work is included in collections at the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, and the Yale University Art Museum, among others, along with many private collections. Pecchio has shown across the United States, as well as internationally in China, Spain, Italy and Holland. Her work has been featured in ArtNews, Details, Camera Arts and V magazines. She is the author of two books, eight, an artist’s book published by Nexus Press, and509, a limited edition monograph published by Daniel 13 Press. Pecchio is represented by Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York. She is currently Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Virginia. website

Tessa Bunney

 
  Jyväsjärvi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Jyväsjärvi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010


Järvenjää/ Lakeice
The interaction between man and nature has a long history in Finland. With a population of 130,974, Jyväskylä is the capital of Central Finland and the largest city in the Finnish Lakeland, an area of more than 188,000 lakes. Situated on the northern coast of Lake Päijänne and 270 kms north of Helsinki, the city has been continuously one of the most rapidly growing cities in Finland since World War II and is surrounded by lakes, hills and forests.

Over the past decades, Finland has experienced an unprecedented rate of economic, technological and social change. The whole way of life is now completely different from how it was only a few decades ago. However, the need to connect to the tranquillity of nature remains.

My aim with the project Järvenjää/Lakeice was to explore interrelations between people and their immediate environment; allowing the viewer to reflect on diverse uses of natural landscapes within the city. To achieve this work I spent every day walking and travelling by local bus around Jyväskylä to the many lakes in and around the city. Initially, I’m working like a street photographer – nothing is predetermined; the series is built up by spending time out there experiencing changes in the weather and responding to what I see and the people I meet. Later I spent time with the groups of ice swimmers who meet several times a week to relax, take a sauna and swim in a hole in the ice.

Sometimes in blizzard conditions and always in sub-zero temperatures, this often meant wading knee deep in snow across frozen lakes to reach my chosen destination. I was fascinated with how the frozen lakes had transformed the city and they had become a temporary urban park with its specially constructed ice skating track with other more random paths carved out by ski-ers, dog walkers and pedestrians making short cuts from the houses on the otherside of the city. The division between the land and water had disappeared.

Järvenjää/Lakeice is part of the Chrysalis Arts’ Connections North international residency exchange programme and is supported by Arts Council England.

  Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Vuorilammen sauna, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Vuorilammen sauna, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Vuorilampi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Luonetjärvi, Tikkakosken from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Luonetjärvi, Tikkakosken from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Luonetjärvi, Tikkakosken from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

Luonetjärvi, Tikkakosken from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, March 2010

  Jyväsjärvi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, February 2012

Jyväsjärvi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, February 2012

  Tuomiojärvi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, February 2012

Tuomiojärvi, Jyväskylä from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, February 2012

  Jätkänkämppä sauna, Kuopio from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, February 2012

Jätkänkämppä sauna, Kuopio from the series Järvenjää/Lakeice, February 2012

Bio
Since graduating from West Surrey College of Art and Design in 1988, Tessa Bunney has worked as a documentary photographer undertaking personal projects and editorial photography as well as a wide range of commissions and residencies nationally and internationally.

She has a particular interest in different landscapes and the way they are shaped by human activity. Working closely with communities and individuals, Bunneys work explores people’s relationship to the environment.  Her project Home Work was published by Dewi Lewis in 2010 and was exhibited and published nationally and internationally including the Land exhibition as part of the Noorderlicht Festival, 2010. Bunney  is currently based in Vientiane, Lao PDR while working on an ongoing project Field, Forest and Family for which she has received a Grant for the Arts Award from Arts Council England.  She is also undertaking freelance work for NGOs. Her series The Women of UCT6 which documents an all female UXO clearance team in Laos was recently published in the Financial Times Magazine (UK) and was also shown online along with the photo film To Serve a Nation, a collaboration with an audio producer.

Bunney is represented by Zoe Bingham Fine Art in London and Klompching Gallery in New York. website

Sabine Mirlesse

 


As if it should have been a quarry
This work, As if it should have been a quarry, named for a phrase from the American poet Robert Frost’s 1954 poem “Directive”, was shot between 2011-2013 in Iceland—a country in the middle of the Atlantic ocean positioned directly above a continental divide, making it the site of frequent seismic and volcanic activity. In January of 1973 a volcano erupted without warning in the small town of Heimaey in the Westman Islands just off the south coast. This work is inspired by the story of the inhabitants of the town that dug themselves out of the ash and stopped the flow of lava from destroying their harbor. Despite the mayhem caused by the eruption, they were determined to stay. Now, forty years later, while many homes have been recuperated and reoccupied, abandoned excavations hold the remains of the houses that proved unsalvageable. The excavations exist as a unique scenario in which during one individual’s own lifetime his or her own archaeological history is being explored—a chance to literally witness one’s own stories coming out of the ground, the survivors living to confront them in person. As a gesture towards reversing the process of unearthing the tales buried beneath the land’s surface, I sought to create a new narrative with the earth by using natural clay from regions around the country with particularly high volcanic or seismic activity and implementing it to bear witness to the visage of icelanders young and old through imprints mirroring those of light. Natural disasters like these are becoming more and more commonplace in our changing global environment, and it seems all too relevant to notice how the contemporary relationship between human beings and the land they live on can be desperately fragile and tenuous as it once may have been centuries and centuries ago. This body of work seeks to investigate the way in which one reconciles one’s own impermanence through living with a continuity that suggests the infinite, and how a piece of land can be a reflection of one’s countenance and vice versa, like maps in conversational flux with one another. For me, considering the passage of time in its relation to both physical and emotional space is to allow for an innate metaphysical inquiry to be explored—that of our own vulnerability and survival as possibly found in the landscapes that grow us into being.

Bio
Sabine Mirlesse grew up between Los Angeles, California and New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. She holds a BA in Religious Studies and English Literature from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, and additionally studied for one year at the Universiteit van Amsterdam in the Netherlands. In 2010 she graduated with a MFA in Photography from Parsons the New School for Design in New York City. Mirlesses work has been the subject of features in The British Journal of Photography, Burn,, and Le Mondes M magazine. Additionally, she has contributed to The Paris Review, BOMB, Art in America, Aperture among other art journals as a writer and has conducted interviews with several established artists as writer. Just recently she was chosen as a notable emerging photographer of 2013 by Magenta Foundation/Flash Forward. Mirlesse lives between Paris and New York City. Her latest body of work is based in Armenia. website

Birgitta Lund

 
  The Garden #1

The Garden #1


The Garden (2013)
The Garden is a contemporary photographic tale that uses Tivoli Gardens an old amusement park in the middle of Copenhagen Denmark as an allegory. Here people of all different nationalities and ethnicities meet in a world of fantasy. An imaginary Orient with fake palaces and minarets is the backdrop of the place. It’s a surreal world, yet it mirrors the dreams and fears of life outside the entrance.

  The Garden #2

The Garden #2

  The Garden #3

The Garden #3

  The Garden #5

The Garden #5

  The Garden #9

The Garden #9

  The Garden #10

The Garden #10

  The Garden #17

The Garden #17

  The Garden #18

The Garden #18

  The Garden #22

The Garden #22

  The Garden #23

The Garden #23

Bio
Birgitta Lund is a visual artist based in Copenhagen, Denmark. She studied at the International Center of Photography in New York where she subsequently lived and worked for 18 years. Her work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe and is held in collections. The photographic project In Transit (2005), a personal and geopolitical reflection on the time in which she made the transition from the United States to Europe, was awarded the Prix HSBC by Fondation HSBC pour la Photographie/Paris, Foghdals Photographer Award/Copenhagen, and a monograph was published by Actes Sud/Arles. Her latest monograph The Garden (2013) was just published by Space Poetry in Denmark. Her work is represented by Julie Saul Gallery, New York. For more info. website

Katherine Turczan

 
  Hair Girl

Hair Girl


Brezhnev’s Daughters (2010-present)
Brezhnev’s Daughters, is what women call themselves in Dneprodzerzhinsk, Ukraine, the birthplace of Leonid Brezhnev and the industrial heartland of Ukraine. The women say that they are Brezhnev’s children because they have inherited the failed stagnant policies from the Soviet times.

Dneprodzerzhinsk, Ukraine is in the heart of Ukraine’s mining and manufacturing production. In these parts many women make their living as factory workers and welders. Yet their pay is never sufficient to support their families. Many must take on extra work at night some as strippers and pole dancers. This dual life style offers economic opportunity. Their sexuality is their strength and they use it as a form of emancipation. Brezhnev’s Daughters is a series of portraits of these women in industrial south who have managed to navigate between two extreme professions and support their families.

These photographs are made with an 8×10 camera and printed on Silver-Gelatin Paper.

  Anya and Carolina

Anya and Carolina

  Katja

Katja

  Karolina

Karolina

  Anastasia

Anastasia

  Sasha

Sasha

  Tanya and Vladimir

Tanya and Vladimir

  Verushka

Verushka

  Rusalka

Rusalka

  Natasha

Natasha

Bio
Katherine Turczans work is in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, as well as many other prominent collections. She has received several awards for her work, including the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Fulbright Fellowship, which have allowed her to travel extensively in Eastern Europe and to make photographs that reflect the changes in the former Soviet Union. She received her MFA from Yale University and her BFA from Cooper Union. She currently is a professor at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. website

Kristy Carpenter

 


Since We’ve Spoken
Curated by Megan Charland

Four and a half years ago, the summer before I left for college, my father died from cancer. While home I witnessed each member of my family dealing with this loss differently. Going away to school that fall I missed much of the transition period and instead came home each break to find something new—fresh wallpaper, different furniture, a new car. My mother had found ways to come to terms with her new life alone in our house by transforming it into a new space. The farm outside had been altered too, different from how I left it. Some familiar things remained, untouched by the chaos, but it was uncertain how long they would remain. Home still felt like home, but there was always this fear that even that might change.

This work serves both as a memorial for my father and as a letter to him.

All images are Untitled from the book Since We’ve Spoken (2011).

Bio
Kristy Carpenter (b. 1987) grew up on a farm in the small rural town of Bronson, Michigan. She earned a BA in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard University May 2010. Currently she is a second year graduate student in the Imaging Arts MFA program at Rochester Institute of Technology of Rochester, New York. website

Megan Charland (b. 1985) is an artist and educator living in Rochester, NY. website

Claire Beckett

 
  Above Medina Jabal Town, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009

Above Medina Jabal Town, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009


Simulating Iraq
My studio practice focuses on conceptually driven large-format photography. I am particularly interested in photographic representation across the themes of difference, cultural mimesis and gender. These ideas are reflected in my current project, Simulating Iraq, which deals with American military training for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Although the concepts I explore in this series are specific to the present political and cultural climate, the project springs from a decade-long interest in using photography to engage critically with the world in which I live. A beautiful or carefully considered image is never enough. I seek to create images that are visually compelling but also explore themes that have personal resonance. Often my ideas stem from politics and news stories, not so much for an ideological reason, but because they move me deeply.

The images in Simulating Iraq are made on military bases within the U.S., in fabricated environments that replicate the places where American troops are deployed. These pictures are about how we as Americans interact with and understand our place in the world. To me, the places that I photograph take on a kind of amalgamated identity, not American, not Iraqi, not Afghani, not Somali, but something entirely different. While the planners of these facilities may understand them as replications of specific places—say Fallujah, Iraq or Helmond Provence, Afghanistan—I understand them as spaces of their own. The setting depicted here is that of the “Other,” of the non-White, non-Western, non-Christian, non-Democratic. It is the place of terrorists and bad guys of all stripes, a place in need of order, of discipline, of salvation.

Among the photographs are images of pseudo-Islamic architecture, sweeping desert vistas evoking unknown adventure, and portraits of those pretending to be villagers in an occupied land or terrorists at war against the Americans. There are American soldiers and Marines, combat veterans who now play the roles of the very jihadis that they previously battled in real life. In other pictures, immigrants from Afghanistan, some who have fled to the U.S. as refugees, now role-play as themselves, or rather as surreal versions of their former selves. I am interested in understanding the experience of the people who spend time here. What does it feel like for a young soldier to have their first encounter with profound cultural difference in this environment? What is the experience of a refugee, or of a veteran suffering from PTSD, when reenacting the context of their real life trauma? Although these spaces are meant as imitations of reality, what exists here is significant in its own right.

  Army Specialist Gary McCorkle playing the role of “Jibril Ihsan Hamal,” a key member of the leading terrorist group in town, Islamic Army of Iraq, with an IED, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009

Army Specialist Gary McCorkle playing the role of “Jibril Ihsan Hamal,” a key member of the leading terrorist group in town, Islamic Army of Iraq, with an IED, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009

  Civilian Afghan-American Women role playing as Afghan villagers during a Marine Corps Training, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Civilian Afghan-American Women role playing as Afghan villagers during a Marine Corps Training, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

  Marine Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens playing the role of a Taliban fighter, Landing Zone Owl, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Marine Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens playing the role of a Taliban fighter, Landing Zone Owl, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

  Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA 2009

Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA 2009

  Army Specialist Jake Morash playing the role of Iraqi “Kahtan Abban Issa,”  an anti-American IED maker, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

Army Specialist Jake Morash playing the role of Iraqi “Kahtan Abban Issa,”  an anti-American IED maker, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

  Sharq Village Market, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

Sharq Village Market, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

  Marines Sargent John Sexon, Lance Corporal Cameron Stark and Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens roleplaying as Taliban fighters, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Marines Sargent John Sexon, Lance Corporal Cameron Stark and Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens roleplaying as Taliban fighters, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

  Civilian Joshua Osborne playing the role of an Iraqi civilian, Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Civilian Joshua Osborne playing the role of an Iraqi civilian, Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

  Marine Lance Corporal Nicole Camala Veen playing the role of an Iraqi nurse in the town of Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Marine Lance Corporal Nicole Camala Veen playing the role of an Iraqi nurse in the town of Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Bio
Born and raised in Chicago, Claire Beckett earned a BA in Anthropology at Kenyon College. She then worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Benin, West Africa, before going on to earn an MFA in Photography at Mass College of Art + Design.

Claire Beckett is represented by Carroll and Sons Gallery in Boston. Her photographs have been featured in solo exhibitions at Carroll and Sons, Bernard Toale Gallery and the University of Rhode Island, and a solo show is forthcoming at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at Mass MoCA, the Chelsea Museum of Art, the Haggerty Museum, the Photographic Resource Center, Hendershot Gallery, Simmons College, FOTODOK (NL), and the Noorderlicht Festival (NL), among others. She is a recipient of an Artadia Award, a Blanche Coleman Award, and a Massachusetts Cultural Council Grant.

Claire Beckett resides in Boston, where she divides her time between her life as an artist and her life as a photography professor. For the 2011-2012 academic year, she is a full-time visiting faculty member in photography at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. website

Irina Rozovsky

 


One to Nothing
One to Nothing describes a fight that has no beginning or end, its players locked in eternal opposition. These photographs were made in Israel, a place of historic conflict where it is not always clear who is the victor and the victim. To an outsider watching the news, the score may appear easy to tally, but once immersed in the country itself, the struggle takes on daunting proportions and complexities. It is a Gordian knot, becoming ever more tightly coiled as you try to unravel it.

These photographs are not political. They are not meant to defend a side or critique the problem. In Israel I had the privilege as a photographer of being removed from the hard facts, and instead moved by the echoes of conflicts and oppositions that became evident in the fabric of everyday life. These are images about the immensity of a struggle, the helplessness of the individuals in its midst, and a beauty that seeps through the tension.

All images are Untitled from One to Nothing (2010).

Bio
Irina Rozovsky is a Moscow-born, Brooklyn-based photographer whose work has been exhibited and published in the US and abroad. Her new book One to Nothing (Kehrer Verlag, Heidelberg) was released in 2011 and named as one of the best photo books of the year by Alec Soth and photo-eye Magazine. Irina teaches photography at the International Center of Photography, New York. website