Yanina Manolova

 
Destiny, 4, poses in her stepfather’s car in Mansfield, Ohio. Destiny’s biological father was a drug dealer and was recently released from prison. She has never seen him. Her mother, Patricia, went through substance abuse treatment and graduated in the Spring of 2009. She relapsed again in June of 2009. Destiny lives with her grandparents in Mansfield, Ohio.

Destiny, 4, poses in her stepfather’s car in Mansfield, Ohio. Destiny’s biological father was a drug dealer and was recently released from prison. She has never seen him. Her mother, Patricia, went through substance abuse treatment and graduated in the Spring of 2009. She relapsed again in June of 2009. Destiny lives with her grandparents in Mansfield, Ohio.


Neverland
“Substance abuse and addiction cause illness, injury, death and crime, savage our children, overwhelm social service systems, impede education — and slap a heavy and growing tax on our citizens” – Susan Foster, National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA), Vice President and Director of Policy Research and Analysis

Since the fall of 2008, I have been documenting my experiences while living among several Appalachian women during a period of their recovery from substance abuse and domestic violence. In November of 2009, I produced Neverland, a short documentary film. I hope to enable others to better understand the roots of destructive addictions, and the harsh road to recovery.

In the United States, only about 2 percent of government funding for drug and substance abuse is used for prevention, while the remainder is spent on substance abuse treatment, and its secondary consequences, such as prosecuting offenders and putting them in prison. The state of Ohio is in desperate need of legal reform to address drug abuse as a public health concern rather than a criminal justice issue. Public awareness needs to be raised regarding the strong correlation between domestic violence and substance abuse, as I have witnessed first-hand that many of these women become addicts as a result of incest or family violence. In far too many cases, battered women begin using drugs or alcohol to mask their pain, fear and embarrassment. This fragile population of women is characterized by a lack of self-esteem, self-destructiveness, severe mental health disorders, and the lack of a constructive life pattern.

Those who are most affected by addiction are the children. Most of these women have 2 or 3 children, of whom many have lost custody. What is the future of these children? Are they destined to become the next victims, batterers or addicts? Is it possible to break the cycle that often passes silently from one generation to another?

Jessica, 27, talks on the phone with her boyfriend, during her relapse after having 7 months of sobriety.  She has survived several abusive relationships. She was abusing drugs and alcohol. Jessica had 5 children from 3 different men, and has lost custody of all of her children. In January of 2009, Jessica went for treatment at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program.

Jessica, 27, talks on the phone with her boyfriend, during her relapse after having 7 months of sobriety.  She has survived several abusive relationships. She was abusing drugs and alcohol. Jessica had 5 children from 3 different men, and has lost custody of all of her children. In January of 2009, Jessica went for treatment at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program.

A letter written by Lisa on October 8, 2008, is seen in her house on February 3, 2009, in Waverly, Ohio. In November of 2008, she completed an alcohol treatment program at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio. She was sexually abused by her father at age 6. Her husband, a drug addict, sexually abused her as well, and she has 3 children by him, all of whom are drug addicts.

A letter written by Lisa on October 8, 2008, is seen in her house on February 3, 2009, in Waverly, Ohio. In November of 2008, she completed an alcohol treatment program at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio. She was sexually abused by her father at age 6. Her husband, a drug addict, sexually abused her as well, and she has 3 children by him, all of whom are drug addicts.

Clients of the Rural Women’s Recovery Program practice yoga on Friday, May 8, 2009, in Athens, Ohio. The State of Ohio has one of the most elaborate chemical dependency treatment systems for women in the United States in terms of the strength of the women’s programming. According to the Health Recovery Services in Athens, Ohio, both the number of facilities for women, and funding for the existing facilities, are declining.

Clients of the Rural Women’s Recovery Program practice yoga on Friday, May 8, 2009, in Athens, Ohio. The State of Ohio has one of the most elaborate chemical dependency treatment systems for women in the United States in terms of the strength of the women’s programming. According to the Health Recovery Services in Athens, Ohio, both the number of facilities for women, and funding for the existing facilities, are declining.

Stephanie, 19, cries on her mother’s shoulder after graduating from the Rural Women’s Recovery Program on Tuesday, April 14, 2009, in Athens, Ohio. Her probation officer ordered her to attend the substance abuse program due to her drug charges. She lost custody of both of her children. She started using drugs when she was with her ex-boyfriend, Carroll, the father of her daughter. “He beat me all the time, choked me, shouted at me, put a knife to my throat. I felt like shit. That’s why I used – so that I could hide my feelings. I started out with lower doses of Vicodin and Percocet, then I went to Oxycontin and heroin.”

Stephanie, 19, cries on her mother’s shoulder after graduating from the Rural Women’s Recovery Program on Tuesday, April 14, 2009, in Athens, Ohio. Her probation officer ordered her to attend the substance abuse program due to her drug charges. She lost custody of both of her children. She started using drugs when she was with her ex-boyfriend, Carroll, the father of her daughter. “He beat me all the time, choked me, shouted at me, put a knife to my throat. I felt like shit. That’s why I used – so that I could hide my feelings. I started out with lower doses of Vicodin and Percocet, then I went to Oxycontin and heroin.”

A client at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio, draws on a piece of paper, while, her baby cries on the sofa at the Program.

A client at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio, draws on a piece of paper, while, her baby cries on the sofa at the Program.

Deanna, 33, cries in her temporary housing provided by the Salvation Army Shelter in Newark, Ohio. She has been physically abused by her husband. She lost custody on her son, and even though she went through a substance abuse treatment program, she could not stop abusing alcohol. Hall is on the waiting list for another substance abuse treatment program.

Deanna, 33, cries in her temporary housing provided by the Salvation Army Shelter in Newark, Ohio. She has been physically abused by her husband. She lost custody on her son, and even though she went through a substance abuse treatment program, she could not stop abusing alcohol. Hall is on the waiting list for another substance abuse treatment program.

Kristen, 20, a client at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio, is about to brush her hair in the bathroom.

Kristen, 20, a client at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio, is about to brush her hair in the bathroom.

Jessica’s belongings lie on the floor of her aunt’s house in Pomeroy, Ohio, on Tuesday, April 28, 2009, right after her graduation from the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio. Jessica went through several abusive relationships, and was abusing drugs and alcohol. She had 5 children from 3 different men, and has lost custody of all of her children.

Jessica’s belongings lie on the floor of her aunt’s house in Pomeroy, Ohio, on Tuesday, April 28, 2009, right after her graduation from the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in Athens, Ohio. Jessica went through several abusive relationships, and was abusing drugs and alcohol. She had 5 children from 3 different men, and has lost custody of all of her children.

Deanna, 33, welcomes her son Kehnan, 10, at her temporary housing at the Salvation Army shelter in Newark, Ohio. Deanna has been physically abused by her husband. She lost custody on her son, and even though she went through a substance abuse treatment program, she could not stop abusing alcohol.

Deanna, 33, welcomes her son Kehnan, 10, at her temporary housing at the Salvation Army shelter in Newark, Ohio. Deanna has been physically abused by her husband. She lost custody on her son, and even though she went through a substance abuse treatment program, she could not stop abusing alcohol.

Patricia, 27, smokes crack in Mansfield, Ohio. She graduated from the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in the Spring of 2009. She relapsed in June of 2009. Patricia was sexually abused at age 14 by a middle-aged man, her father’s best friend. She has been using alcohol and drugs (marijuana, crack, cocaine, oxycodone and morphine) since she was 14. “I got pregnant with my daughter by a drug dealer, and I went for treatment for about 9 months while I was pregnant. He is in prison and he has never seen her.”

Patricia, 27, smokes crack in Mansfield, Ohio. She graduated from the Rural Women’s Recovery Program in the Spring of 2009. She relapsed in June of 2009. Patricia was sexually abused at age 14 by a middle-aged man, her father’s best friend. She has been using alcohol and drugs (marijuana, crack, cocaine, oxycodone and morphine) since she was 14. “I got pregnant with my daughter by a drug dealer, and I went for treatment for about 9 months while I was pregnant. He is in prison and he has never seen her.”

Jessica, 27, left, sits next to Kelci, 20, while Kelci holds her baby Caiden on Wednesday, May 20, 2009, in Logan, Ohio. Jessica and Kelci met at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program. In April, 2009, they graduated from the Program, and they lived together at Kelci’s house for 5 days. “Coming from a rehab where you were clean for 4 months, had a stable life. Coming home with people who are using pills and marijuana in front of you,” Kelci said.

Jessica, 27, left, sits next to Kelci, 20, while Kelci holds her baby Caiden on Wednesday, May 20, 2009, in Logan, Ohio. Jessica and Kelci met at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program. In April, 2009, they graduated from the Program, and they lived together at Kelci’s house for 5 days. “Coming from a rehab where you were clean for 4 months, had a stable life. Coming home with people who are using pills and marijuana in front of you,” Kelci said.

Deanna, 33, left, cries after a visit from her husband and son at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program on Sunday, September 21, 2008, in Athens, Ohio, She has been at the Program for two weeks, and has been diagnosed with alcohol problems. Lisa, 44, right, is sad after her boyfriend’s visit to see her at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program. She has been diagnosed with alcohol problems, and has been attending the Program for two weeks. She was sexually abused by her father at age 6; her husband, a drug addict, sexually abused her as well, and she has three children by him, all of whom are drug addicts. Hannah, 29, far left, talks to her mother, far right, during their family visit time. Hannah has been diagnosed with alcohol problems, which began when she was fifteen. She was abused by her father as a child.

Deanna, 33, left, cries after a visit from her husband and son at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program on Sunday, September 21, 2008, in Athens, Ohio, She has been at the Program for two weeks, and has been diagnosed with alcohol problems. Lisa, 44, right, is sad after her boyfriend’s visit to see her at the Rural Women’s Recovery Program. She has been diagnosed with alcohol problems, and has been attending the Program for two weeks. She was sexually abused by her father at age 6; her husband, a drug addict, sexually abused her as well, and she has three children by him, all of whom are drug addicts. Hannah, 29, far left, talks to her mother, far right, during their family visit time. Hannah has been diagnosed with alcohol problems, which began when she was fifteen. She was abused by her father as a child.

Bio
Yanina Manolova is native of Bulgaria. In 2000 she moved to the United States where she is currently a graduate student in photojournalism at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication.   She has worked on different projects in Africa, Latin America, Europe and USA. Manolova’s real dedication is working on worldwide humanitarian and health care associated projects.  Her work has been featured in USA Today, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), National Geographic (Bulgaria) and many others.  Her photos appeared in numerous exhibits and she has won several international awards and various nominations including in the Alexia Foundation for World Peace, Northern Short Course in Photojournalism, Southern Short Course in News Photography, NPPA Women In Photojournalism and many others.

Manolova’s latest work is a short documentary film detailing her experience while living among several Appalachian women during a period of their recovery from substance abuse and domestic violence. website.

Bonnell Robinson and Dana Mueller

 
View over the Isonzo from Caporetto, Italy (now Slovenia), 2008 | Bonnell Robinson. Images courtesy of Rick Wester Fine Art

View over the Isonzo from Caporetto, Italy (now Slovenia), 2008 | Bonnell Robinson. Images courtesy of Rick Wester Fine Art


No Man’s Land
Bonnell Robinson and Dana Mueller are photographers working on related independent projects that combine personal motives with European and American landscapes linked to the two World Wars. The exhibition includes Robinson’s black and white photographs of WWI sites, and Mueller’s color images of German Prisoner-of-War sites in the United States during WWII. At first glance, the images appear peaceful and bucolic, objective landscapes of quiet rural corners. Once the viewer has the opportunity to take in the details, other layers begin to emerge.

T.L. Robinson, Bonnell Robinson’s grandfather, served in the Red Cross from 1917-1919 during the Great War (1914-1918). Inspired by the discovery of her grandfather’s journal, Robinson set out to vicariously experience a point in history that remains largely overshadowed by WWII. Following his journal, she traveled sites along the Western Front in France and Belgium, the Southern Front in Italy, Austria and Slovenia, and was overwhelmed by the expanse of land and visible remnants of battle. She found fields thinly layered with new growth but scarred and rippled from filled trenches. She encountered undetonated shells piled in corners of fields by farmers for disposal, and even an excavation of a British soldier, bringing to life the reality of the war and how it still exists in many people’s lives. Through these quiet images, Robinson reflects on the vastness of a war that claimed a total of 9.7 million people. She hopes these images will encourage dialogue into “why nations engage in war, tolerate it, endure it, and fail to commit to other solutions.”

As an East German immigrant, Dana Mueller addresses German history and the relationship between the landscape and the shaping of national identity. By looking at the WWII German Prisoner-of-War experience in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina, she investigates the irony of German foot soldiers and high-ranking Nazi officers nurturing American soil versus the destruction they caused in Eastern Europe led by Hitler. Mueller’s images of fields and pastures relate to the period of Romanticism in literature and the arts in the mid 19th Century, and earlier, that illustrated a longing to return to a pristine, beautiful experience of nature, as an expression of the divine. This ideal was later appropriated by the Nazis and German Fascists, tied to German identity and used as propaganda, relating to the German military policy of Lebensraum.

While the centenary of the First World War is half a decade away and World War II has become an event in the popular imagination mined for inspiration, our current era is also being defined by the horrors of war. Robinson and Mueller’s photographs, far removed from the living action that occurred at the sites, are poignant reminders of what is left after the fighting is done. Far more than the spirit photographs of the 19th Century, their images record the ghosts that continue to haunt, to roam the fields of collective memories and humanity.

Sarah Stout, Associate Director | Rick Wester Fine ArtFor more information about both projects please visit the gallery website.

Kluze Fortress, near Bovec (now Slovenia), 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Kluze Fortress, near Bovec (now Slovenia), 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Fields by the Marne River near Chateau-Thierry, 2007 | Bonnell Robinson

Fields by the Marne River near Chateau-Thierry, 2007 | Bonnell Robinson

Shells by field near Baumont-Hamel, France, 2007 | Bonnell Robinson

Shells by field near Baumont-Hamel, France, 2007 | Bonnell Robinson

Vimy Ridge, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Vimy Ridge, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Excavation site, International Trench, Ypres (Ieper), 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Excavation site, International Trench, Ypres (Ieper), 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Field Hospital, the Carso, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Field Hospital, the Carso, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

View across the Adriatic towards Golametto from the terrace at Duino Castle, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

View across the Adriatic towards Golametto from the terrace at Duino Castle, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Monte Grappa, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Monte Grappa, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Tunnel, Monte Pasubio, Dolomites, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Tunnel, Monte Pasubio, Dolomites, Italy, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Wilfred Owen's Grave, Ors, France, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Wilfred Owen's Grave, Ors, France, 2008 | Bonnell Robinson

Farm near Albert, Department of the Somme, 2007 | Bonnell Robinson

Farm near Albert, Department of the Somme, 2007 | Bonnell Robinson

The Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia/ North Carolina border, 2009 | Dana Mueller

The Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia/ North Carolina border, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Site of Pickett's Charge, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Site of Pickett's Charge, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Edenton, Northeastern Regional Airport, Edenton, North Carolina, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Edenton, Northeastern Regional Airport, Edenton, North Carolina, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Lee at Fort Lee Military Base near Petersburg, Virginia, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Lee at Fort Lee Military Base near Petersburg, Virginia, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Abandoned farm near Elizabeth City, Camden County, North Carolina, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Abandoned farm near Elizabeth City, Camden County, North Carolina, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Somerset, near Westover, Somerset County, Maryland, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Somerset, near Westover, Somerset County, Maryland, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Cotton field, Sheldon's Farm, near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Cotton field, Sheldon's Farm, near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Peary across the York River, York County, Virginia, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Peary across the York River, York County, Virginia, 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Edenton, Northeastern Regional Airport, Edenton, North Carolina 2009 | Dana Mueller

Camp Edenton, Northeastern Regional Airport, Edenton, North Carolina 2009 | Dana Mueller

Bio

Bonnell Robinson is Professor of Photography and Art History at the Art Institute of Boston where she is also the Director of Exhibitions. After having taken a long hiatus from photography to pursue teaching and curatorial work, she began to photograph again in Russia (2003) and Eastern Europe (2004) concentrating on sites associated with critical moments in history. Her current project on the Great War has covered the Western and Southern Fronts (2006-2009) and beginning in 2011, she intends to continue documenting sites in Gallipoli (Turkey) and the Middle East. Her past photographic work has been exhibited at the Fogg Art Museum, Addison Gallery of American Art, George Eastman House, Smithsonian Institution, and the Houston Center for Photography among others. After graduate studies with Minor White at M.I.T. and receiving her MFA at Rhode Island School of Design, she became Assistant to the Curator of Photographs at the Fogg Art Museum and, later, Historical Consultant in Photography to the Peabody Museum and the Widener Library at Harvard University. Her expertise is in Middle Eastern and East Asian 19th Century photography with emphasis on the Beato Brothers and Japanese photographers of the Meiji period. Beginning her teaching career in 1980, Robinson has taught on the faculties of MassArt, RISD, Boston University, and Brandeis University as well as the Art Institute of Boston. website.

Dana Mueller was born and raised in Thueringia, East Germany until the fall of the Berlin Wall. She is an Adjunct Professor in photography and art history at the Art Institute of Boston. She received her MFA in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Her work has consistently addressed German identity, memory, history and landscape, inspired by Caspar David Friedrich, Anselm Kiefer and W.G. Sebald. As part of her current project, Devil’s Den, Mueller has photographed sites related to the WWII German Prisoner-of-War experience in the US. Having already photographed in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and parts of the American South, Mueller intends to extend into Texas, Louisiana and New Mexico. Mueller is the recipient of 2009 + 2008 Faculty Development Grants, the Art Institute of Boston, the 2008 Next Perspective 2nd Place – HotShoe International, UK, the 2007 St. Botolph Club Foundation Grant and her work has been exhibited at Rick Wester Fine Art, NY, the Photographic Resource Center, Boston, MA, the Massachusetts College of Art + Design, Boston, MA, the Art Institute of Boston, MA, Bridge ARTFair, Miami, FL, North East Space, New Haven, CT, among others. website.

Elin Berge

 
Suvanan and Mikael, Bjurholm, 2007

Suvanan and Mikael, Bjurholm, 2007


Drottninglandet
One day when I flew from Stockholm to Umeå, a town in northeastern Sweden where I grew up, I met a Buddhist monk from Thailand on the plane. He really stood out in his orange robe amongst the other bored looking commuters, and when I asked was he was doing there he answered that he was going to build the largest Buddhist temple in Europe in the little village Fredrika, in Lapland, 105 kilometers from Umeå. He invited me to follow and the next day I started to photograph in Fredrika. It was a beautiful tale about this holy man who was giving hope to a village affected by depopulation and unemployment. I published it in a few magazines.

During this period I moved back home to Umeå after a couple of years living in Stockholm, because of the love to the man that now is my husband and to find time to work with long term projects. I dreamt of a different life than the one I had at the moment.

I was really fascinated by the village Fredrika. Even though I was brought up so close to the area, everything seemed new to me. As the urban citizen I am, I was colored by the ideas of the Northern inland as male dominated and stagnated, given to me by authors and moviemakers. What I saw during the Buddhist ceremonies was something entirely different. The Thai women I met caught my interest the most, always together with Swedish men. In the context of the ceremonies, they seemed more familiar in the environment than I felt myself. So I decided to get to know them and at the same time get to know my own home district. During three years I traveled back and forth along what is called the road of the Seven Rivers, running between Umeå by the coast and Fredrika, to photograph Thai/Swedish couples. My focus was on the Thai women in the Swedish male milieu.

This work later became a narrative of longing and the dream of something better, a book and an exhibition with the title Drottninglandet (Queensland). To dream and to strive is something that unites all humans and I always search for identification with the people I photograph. The area around Fredrika has traditionally been known as “Drottninglandet” because a number of villages there bear the name of a Swedish queen. Nearly all the women I have photographed are from a poor region in northeastern Thailand, an area many have to leave to find work. They move to the cities, the tourist destinations, or in this case, abroad together with men. Thailand is often spoken of as “the Kingdom” and is, like so many other countries, a place where men have more possibilities than women. So my title is symbolic, standing for all the things I imagine a woman can dream about when a man offers her another life. The question if the dream comes true or not is something I leave to the beholder.

Thitaree, Fredrika, 2008

Thitaree, Fredrika, 2008

Phi’s wedding dress next to a wedding photo of Bertil and her sister Kong, Vännäsby, 2008

Phi’s wedding dress next to a wedding photo of Bertil and her sister Kong, Vännäsby, 2008

Leif and Phi dancing at the wedding receptiom, Vännäs, 2008

Leif and Phi dancing at the wedding receptiom, Vännäs, 2008

Birger’s and Gi’s house, Lögda, 2007

Birger’s and Gi’s house, Lögda, 2007

Phim thinking about her sons, Thai Mother’s Day, Fredrika, 2006

Phim thinking about her sons, Thai Mother’s Day, Fredrika, 2006

Håkan and Thonluk, Högås, 2007

Håkan and Thonluk, Högås, 2007

Bo-Erik with a picture of Windey he carried in the wallet while waiting for her to arrive, Agnäs, 2008

Bo-Erik with a picture of Windey he carried in the wallet while waiting for her to arrive, Agnäs, 2008

Celebrating Songkran, Umeå, 2008

Celebrating Songkran, Umeå, 2008

Celebrating Thai Mother’s Day, Fredrika, 2006

Celebrating Thai Mother’s Day, Fredrika, 2006

Gerhard and Jariya, Borgafjäll, 2006

Gerhard and Jariya, Borgafjäll, 2006

Bio
Elin Berge began working as a staff photographer at the local newspaper in Umeå 1999, at the age of 19. Wanting to learn more about life and photography she quitted her job and moved to Stockholm to become an apprentice. She graduated from the Nordic School of Photography 2003 and has since then worked as a freelancer and is published regularly in Swedish and international magazines. Publications where her images have been seen is, amongst others, Vanity Fair, Vision, Courrier International and Time.

2005, she moved back home to the north to find time and space for her own projects, inspired by the great photographer Sune Jonsson who lived and worked in Umeå. Her themes often revolve around women that in different ways are breaking boundaries. 2006 she released her first book and touring exhibition Slöjor (Veils), a portrait story that focused on some of Sweden’s Muslim women and their relation to the symbolically charged veil. 2008 she had her first international show with the series Veils and Suicide Girls at the Menotrentuno – Young Photography in Sardinia. 2009 she released her second book Drottninglandet, a unique documentation of Thai women in marriage migration. This was made in close collaboration with the celebrated Swedish singer/composer Frida Hyvönen, who made an album for the book. The exhibition Drottninglandet was produced by Hasselblad Foundation. Elin Berge has received numerous awards and grants in Sweden and was nominated for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2010 for her book Drottninglandet. website | www.momentagency.com.

Rhona Bitner

 
01

01


Stage
My work is an observation of the parallels between photography and theater. In both we enter a black space and an image appears. What is seen is at once, simply, itself and what it seems to be.

In the past, the work focused entirely on the performer in the spotlight. In this series of photographs entitled STAGE, I focused my attention away from the performer and onto the stage about to be inhabited, or once inhabited, by the performer. Although still and empty, the stage is filled with expectation and, perhaps, dread as lights dim and a curtain begins to rise. Or, after a performance, with nothing left but the physical space and the memory of what occurred there. As such, the images can conjure emptiness and occupied space, equally silent and animated.

NE1

NE1

ST10  

ST10
 

BA1

BA1

MT2  

MT2
 

NV3

NV3

ATH1

ATH1

ST4

ST4

MT3

MT3

FB2


FB2

Bio
Rhona Bitner investigates how the spectacle and experience of performance and theater is represented in a two-dimensional photograph. Currently she is working on a project imaging the legacy of American music. Her work has been exhibited in the United States, France, Switzerland, Greece and Spain. It is represented in the public collections of The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago and the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris, France, among others and has been reviewed widely in publications including Artforum, The New York Times, ArtPress and Beaux Arts. She divides her time between New York and Paris. In 2010 she is a fellow at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Space Program in Brooklyn, NY. website.

Lilly McElroy

 
I throw myself at men #1 | Courtesy of Thomas Robertello Gallery

I throw myself at men #1 | Courtesy of Thomas Robertello Gallery


I Throw Myself at Men
I am, at the moment, part projectile and part foolish romantic. These images are documents of a hopeful and violent gesture, a demand that the possibility of a connection exist. The men often look terrified or at least slightly surprised. My role as aggressor is clear and I think my leaps acknowledge the basic human desire for contact.

To date, there have been no major injuries.

I throw myself at men #2

I throw myself at men #2

I throw myself at men #3

I throw myself at men #3

I throw myself at men #4

I throw myself at men #4

I throw myself at men #5

I throw myself at men #5

I throw myself at men #6

I throw myself at men #6

I throw myself at men #7

I throw myself at men #7

I throw myself at men #8

I throw myself at men #8

I throw myself at men #9

I throw myself at men #9

I throw myself at men #10

I throw myself at men #10

I throw myself at men #11

I throw myself at men #11

I throw myself at men #12

I throw myself at men #12

I throw myself at men #13

I throw myself at men #13

I throw myself at men #14

I throw myself at men #14

Bio
Lilly McElroy was raised in a small town in Southern Arizona where she spent a lot of time at rodeos.  She won a few ribbons and once sold a sheep for a decent price.  She was formally educated at The University of Arizona, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.  The time spent at those institutions lead to her unabashed interest in the cliché and the literal as well a her often misguided attempts at making authentic connections.  It should be noted that Lilly has little to no interest in irony.

McElroy’s work has been featured in Artslant, Art on Paper, Modern Painters, shape + colour, SUDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG, The Wall Street Journal, Elle Magazine, Chicago Tribune, The Year in Pictures by James Danziger as well as featured on NPR.  She is represented by Thomas Robertello Gallery in Chicago, IL.  website |  www.thomasrobertello.com

Jen Davis

 
Fantasy No. 1

Fantasy No. 1


Self-Portraits
In this body of work, I deal with my insecurities about my body image and the direct correlation between self-perception and the way one is perceived by others. Photography is the medium that I use to tell my story through life, an outlet for revealing my thoughts and opinions about the society in which we live. A society that dictates beauty based on ones physical appearance.

In my photographs I aim to raise questions regarding beauty, desire, body image, and identity through a focused observation of my personal story. I have built a relationship between the camera and myself where I transform the act of taking a photograph into a performance for the camera. Many of my pictures take place in my home, revealing aspects of myself that are private and personal. My work is partially based on personal experiences that I have re-constructed into a photograph, and the other part consists of made up fantasies of what I imagine a physical relationship to be regarding intimacy, love and desire.

Untitled Josh's bed

Untitled Josh's bed

Seconds  

Seconds
 

Untitled No. 22

Untitled No. 22

Fantasy No. 2  

Fantasy No. 2
 

Conforming

Conforming

Untitled No. 11

Untitled No. 11

8 Weeks  

8 Weeks
 

Untitled No. 5

Untitled No. 5

Primping

Primping

Andy and I

Andy and I

Untitled No. 29

Untitled No. 29

Untitled No. 15

Untitled No. 15

Bio
Jen Davis is a Brooklyn based photographer. For the past 8 years she has been working on a series of Self-Portrait’s dealing with issues regarding beauty, identity, and body image. She received her MFA from Yale University in 2008, and her BA from Columbia College Chicago in 2002. Her recent exhibitions include a solo show at Indianapolis Museum of Art (iMOCA), and she is currently in a show titled Verses at Hous Projects in NYC. Her work will be included in a show opening the summer of 2010 titled reGeneration2: Tomorrow’s Photographers Today at the Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland. Davis has exhibited widely included group exhibitions at SI FEST: Savignano Immagini Festival in Italy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Center for Photography at Woodstock, Stephen Daiter Contemporary, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Milwaukee Art Museum, and the Galerie Priska Pasquer in Cologne, Germany. Her photographs are in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, The Sir Elton John Photography Collection, and The Library of Congress among others. Her work has been featured in publications including Camera Austria, Aperture, Photography Quarterly, and PDN. Davis is represented by Lee Marks Fine Art. website

Emma Wilcox

 
The Light | Forensic Landscapes

The Light | Forensic Landscapes


Forensic Landscapes | Eminent Domain
In forensics, the absence of something can signify its presence. As reported in the Times, the chemical stain left by a body’s amino acids will suppress plant growth for up to two years, allowing a kind of shadow to remain after the thing casting it is gone.

On maps, the edge of a place vanishes and reappears. So do tracks, roads and the original names of things. There are no indications as to actual habitation, climate, degree of violence or calm, or even whether the area is land or water.

But the land is marked heavy. It is dense chemically, visually, textually. This density of markings includes human bodies, geological timekeeping, stories told in bars, news archives, and EPA documents.

I make photographs at or near night, on foot, and within a 5-mile radius of Newark.

I make photographs of things that can always be found, and are always about to vanish.

But not easily. And not just yet.

The Fence | Forensic Landscapes

The Fence | Forensic Landscapes

Eminent Domain No. 1 | Eminent Domain

Eminent Domain No. 1 | Eminent Domain

Expectations | Eminent Domain

Expectations | Eminent Domain

Eminent Domain No. 2 | Eminent Domain

Eminent Domain No. 2 | Eminent Domain

Father's Day | Forensic Landscapes

Father's Day | Forensic Landscapes

Railroad Avenue | Forensic Landscapes

Railroad Avenue | Forensic Landscapes

Eminent Domain No. 3 | Eminent Domain

Eminent Domain No. 3 | Eminent Domain

Five Days | Forensic Landscapes

Five Days | Forensic Landscapes

Railroad Avenue No. 2 | Forensic Landscapes

Railroad Avenue No. 2 | Forensic Landscapes

Eminent Domain No. 5 | Eminent Domain

Eminent Domain No. 5 | Eminent Domain

The Field (Mulquiladora) | Forensic Landscapes

The Field (Mulquiladora) | Forensic Landscapes

Bio
Emma Wilcox is a photographer concerned with environmental justice, land usage, eminent domain, and the role of individual memory in the creation of local history. She has exhibited in solo shows including Forensic Landscapes, Jersey City Museum, Jersey City, NJ in 2007, and Salvage Rights, Real Art Ways, Hartford, CT in 2009. She is the recipient of a NJ State Arts Council Fellowship for photography, the Camera Club Of NY residency, the Newark Museum Residency and was a core participant in Night School at the New Museum in 2008. She participated in Emerge 7, Aljira, Newark, NJ and AIM 29, Bronx Museum, Bronx, NY. She is also co-founder of Gallery Aferro, a Newark, NJ alternative space. She lives by the river. 

Michal Chelbin

 
Young Cadets, Russia, 2004

Young Cadets, Russia, 2004


Strangely Familiar
The images in this series are an attempt to capture human stories in everyday life, those that exist in the space between the odd and the ordinary. My images are almost always of people and they usually take the form of portraits. Most of the people I photograph have something in common; they are not the mainstream, and many of them are small town performers (For example, they could be dwarfs in a theatre play, ball room dancers or young contortionists). I try to photograph my subjects dislocated from their performing environment and set in casual settings, off stage: at home, on the street or in a park. Some of them with their costumes and others wear everyday cloths. I try to create a seemingly private moment, one where they are not performing or on stage. The main themes in my work are not social or topical, but private and mythical; I search for people who have a legendary quality in them; a mix between odd and ordinary. My images are vehicles to address universal themes: family issues, ideas of normality, puberty with its all incumbent pains and distractions, the desire for fame. An example of this is the adolescent girls I photograph, many of them are on the verge of sexual consciousness. They are in this difficult age, torn between innocence and experience. While their bodies might be still that of a child, their gaze sometimes imply differently. I try to create an informal scene, in which they directly confront the viewer. I feel they and their stories represent with most clarity the theme that interests me the most and which is the twilight zone between reality and fantasy. My aim is to record a scene where there is a mixture of direct information and enigmas and in which there are visual contrasts between young and old, large and small, normal and abnormal. My playground lies between the private and the public, between fiction and documentary. For me, the image is just the tip of the iceberg; it’s the gate to a story waiting to be told and which I try to depict in an appealing yet troubling way. This story is about a life full of contradictions on the battle ground between fantasy and reality. Many viewers tell me that the world discovered in my images is strange. If they find it strange, it is only because the world is indeed a strange place.  I just try to show that.

Alona in the Bed Room, Ukraine 2006

Alona in the Bed Room, Ukraine 2006

An Orphan Boy, Ukraine, 2005

An Orphan Boy, Ukraine, 2005

Angelina with her Father, Israel, 2005

Angelina with her Father, Israel, 2005

Angelina, Israel, 2003

Angelina, Israel, 2003

Black Eye, Ukraine, 2006

Black Eye, Ukraine, 2006

Grandfather, Russia, 2003

Grandfather, Russia, 2003

Jenya and Vitally on a Spring Bed, Russia, 2003

Jenya and Vitally on a Spring Bed, Russia, 2003

Lena with her Poodles, Russia, 2004

Lena with her Poodles, Russia, 2004

Jenya, Ukraine, 2005

Jenya, Ukraine, 2005

Nastya, Russia, 2007

Nastya, Russia, 2007

Oxana, Ukraine, 2006

Oxana, Ukraine, 2006

Sasha, Russia, 2004

Sasha, Russia, 2004

Two Athletes, Ukraine, 2006

Two Athletes, Ukraine, 2006

Xenia on a Coouch, Russia, 2003

Xenia on a Coouch, Russia, 2003

Bio
Based in New York City, Israeli-born, Michal Chelbin has been shown in solo and group shows in the US and abroad in venues such as the Photographer’s Gallery in London , Hendrik Andersen Museum in Rome , the National Portrait Gallery in London , and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The collections of the Portland Museum of Art, Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, Palazzo Forti, and Sir Elton John include her work.

Recent publications include American Photo, PDN, NY Arts Magazine, Aperture, B&W Magazine, and LA Times.  Recent editorial work includes NY Times, The New Yorker, NY Magazine, Ten Men Magazine.  Her first monograph entitled “Strangely Familiar” was published by Aperture in spring 2008.

Michal Chelbin’s solo show entitled “Strangely Familiar” opened in September 2008 at Andrea Meislin Gallery in New York and at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art Israel.  Michal’s 2nd book will be published by Twin Palms in fall 2009. website | www.andreameislin.com

Heather Rasmussen

 
Untitled. (M/V MSC Napoli, English Channel, January 2007). 2009

Untitled. (M/V MSC Napoli, English Channel, January 2007). 2009


DestructConstruct
The series DestructConstruct is based on found photographs of shipping container accidents downloaded from the Internet. Each found image is used as a model for a sculpture that is constructed for the production of the photograph. Individual shipping containers are folded by hand out templates of colored cardstock, and placed according to the found image. The sculpture then exists as a photographic work, which directly relates to the original photograph, including the ship name, place, and date the accident happened. I abstract the scenes of the catastrophes, removing the original context and placing the damaged containers, rendered simply out of colored paper, onto a seamless white background. This process transforms the containers into pristine patterns of color and shape, thereby confusing scale and altering the perception of the shipping container as an object. The paper is now seen as fragile, crushed or torn due to an unknown circumstance.

Untitled. (M/V Maersk Catalina, Halifax, Canada, January 2003). 2008

Untitled. (M/V Maersk Catalina, Halifax, Canada, January 2003). 2008

Untitled. (Osprey Lines Barge, Mississippi River gulf canal, January 2002). 2009

Untitled. (Osprey Lines Barge, Mississippi River gulf canal, January 2002). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Ital Florida, Italy, July 2007). 2008

Untitled. (M/V Ital Florida, Italy, July 2007). 2008

Untitled. (M/V Ital Florida, Italy, July 2007). 2008

Untitled. (M/V Ital Florida, Italy, July 2007). 2008

Untitled. (M/V Maersk Catalina, Halifax, Canada, January 2003). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Maersk Catalina, Halifax, Canada, January 2003). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Excelsior, Koln, Germany, March 2007). 2008

Untitled. (M/V Excelsior, Koln, Germany, March 2007). 2008

Untitled. (M/V OCCL America, Pacific Ocean, February 2000).2008

Untitled. (M/V OCCL America, Pacific Ocean, February 2000).2008

Untitled. (M/V OCCL America, Pacific Ocean, February 2000).2008

Untitled. (M/V OCCL America, Pacific Ocean, February 2000).2008

Untitled. (M/V Saga Spray, Vancouver, Canada, February 2006). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Saga Spray, Vancouver, Canada, February 2006). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Hanjin Pennsylvania, Indian Ocean, November 11, 2002). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Hanjin Pennsylvania, Indian Ocean, November 11, 2002). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Hanjin Pennsylvania, Indian Ocean, November 11, 2002). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Hanjin Pennsylvania, Indian Ocean, November 11, 2002). 2009

Untitled. (M/V CMA CGM Dahlia, Manzillino, Mexico, February 21, 2008). 2009

Untitled. (M/V CMA CGM Dahlia, Manzillino, Mexico, February 21, 2008). 2009

Untitled. (P&O Nedlloyd Barcelona, Pacific Ocean, June 2005). 2009

Untitled. (P&O Nedlloyd Barcelona, Pacific Ocean, June 2005). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Republica di Genoa, Antwerp, March 11, 2007). 2009

Untitled. (M/V Republica di Genoa, Antwerp, March 11, 2007). 2009

Bio
Heather Rasmussen was born in Santa Ana, California and lives and works in Los Angeles. In September 2009, Heather had her second solo exhibition in the Sandroni Rey Container, Los Angeles, a shipping container turned gallery space. In March 2009, Rasmussen had her first solo exhibition, ship happens, with Light & Wire Gallery in Los Angeles. Her work was recently published in the book Unfolded, Paper in Design, Art, Architecture and Industry, alongside artists such as Olafur Eliasson, Thomas Demand and Frank Gehry. Throughout her MFA degree program at California Institute of the Arts, Rasmussen developed ideas with trips to a familiar southern California location: the Port of Los Angeles, where colorful containers became items that were constantly rearranged and choreographed within her lens. She is continuing her work with archiving collections on the WWII Ship, The Lane Victory; making her own shipping container line, HITO; and seeking out disasters in vast seas and forests. website.

Nicole Lloyd

 
Remnants From the Pocono Garden's Kitchen, Paradise Valley, Pennsylvania

Remnants From the Pocono Garden's Kitchen, Paradise Valley, Pennsylvania


Places Like Home
In exploring the places we come from, we are offered the opportunity to reconnect with the past, to try to understand its complexity, and to recognize its significance in shaping who we’ve become. This ongoing series of images is a collection of landscapes from suburban and rural towns scattered across America. I began by photographing areas in northeastern Pennsylvania, where I was raised; it was my effort to reconnect with a place I was once eager to escape. During this process, my emotions were in constant conflict as I wavered between nostalgia and criticism, between gratitude and shame, between hope and sadness. As I sought out the specific sites that I believed would elicit deeper feelings required for self-understanding, I found myself drawn to places I had no prior relationship with. Places that evoked the same emotional and tangible familiarity of home but in some cases were 3,000 miles away. Somehow the distance and the realization that the landscape of my youth was not unique provided me the space to explore something simultaneously more personal and more general about the past and its complex influence on how we perceive ourselves in adulthood and who we eventually become.

Regardless of where these images have been taken, they are all reflections of my past—they are all portraits of home. My hope is that they convey something universal about perception, remembrance, and the understanding that some things are healed by time and some are not. This body of work has been created by using color negative film and a 6×7 rangefinder camera. I print each of my image s traditionally in the darkroom. The prints are then drum-scanned and outputted as archival ink jet prints. Exhibition prints in either sizes 30″x38″ or 44″x56,” depending on the image, and are to be mounted on sintra and framed by using a simple white, wooden frame. The process of making this series has allowed me to acknowledge the beauty in everyday things and elevate that complex beauty to art. By connecting these disparate places through their common bonds, I’m able to make images that feel universally familiar and create a sense of home that is both emotional and tangible at the same time.

Village Drive, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Village Drive, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Houses Off Old Route 22, Lehigh Valley Pennsylvania

Houses Off Old Route 22, Lehigh Valley Pennsylvania

Remnants From The Sign at Pocono Gardens, Paradise Valley, Pennsylvania

Remnants From The Sign at Pocono Gardens, Paradise Valley, Pennsylvania

Quarry Street, Ormrod, Pennsylvania

Quarry Street, Ormrod, Pennsylvania

South 4th Street, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

South 4th Street, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Row Homes, Ormrod, Pennsylvania

Row Homes, Ormrod, Pennsylvania

Weona Park, Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania

Weona Park, Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania

Bio
Nicole Lloyd was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania. She attended the School of Visual Arts in New York City where she received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in photography. During her time at SVA, she was mentored by award-winning photographers Elinor Carucci and Dana Hoey and trained extensively with Julie Pochron in traditional C-printing. Shortly after graduation, Nicole moved to Los Angeles where she currently resides and continues to enthusiastically pursue her fine art career while also producing and curating art shows involving both local and international talent. website.

Tracey Baran

 
I Miss You Already, 2004 | Courtesy of Leslie Tonkonow Artworks+Projects, NYC

I Miss You Already, 2004 | Courtesy of Leslie Tonkonow Artworks+Projects, NYC


WIPNYC and Leslie Tonkonow Present Tracey Baran
This online exhibition in conjunction with the exhibition Pictures of Tracey: Photographs By Tracey Baran at Leslie Tonkonow Artworks+Projects (September 12-October 17, 2009), honors the life and works of Tracey Baran who passed away after a brief illness in November 2008 at the age of 33.

From an essay written for Tracey Baran’s 2002 solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, curator Karen Irvine wrote:

Tracey Baran creates visual journals, using color photography to record and refine her experiences into images that reference fundamental themes such as love, death, and regeneration. Rarely preconceiving her pictures, Baran works in an intuitive manner, casting her photographer’s eye on the world until something sticks. Thus a photograph can occur at any moment, in any place, in a practice that starts with instinct and results in the communication of very universal experiences.

Through a process of careful extraction and editing, Baran creates lyrical images that invite open interpretation. Her photographs function with a cumulative intensity. Like a written diary, in which each entry is better understood upon reading further, the true spirit of Baran’s photographs is discovered when they are considered as a part of the whole. Each photograph informs the others and in that interplay of images, their meaning fluctuates and expands.

-

The Tracey Baran Memorial Auction has been arranged by The School of Visual Arts in order to provide proceeds for an annual grant, open by application, to an emerging female photographer from the US. For information please email info@igavel.com.

Kristy, 2004

Kristy, 2004

Today I'm Thirty, 2005

Today I'm Thirty, 2005

Daren and Dylan, October 31, 2005

Daren and Dylan, October 31, 2005

Oasis, 2004

Oasis, 2004

The Winners, 2005

The Winners, 2005

Suck and Blow, 2002

Suck and Blow, 2002

Mom's New Horse, 2003

Mom's New Horse, 2003

Son and Father, 2005

Son and Father, 2005

Me, Myself and You, 2007

Me, Myself and You, 2007

Who's Leda, 1999

Who's Leda, 1999

See Through Me, 2005

See Through Me, 2005

Untitled (Cherry in Hand), 1998

Untitled (Cherry in Hand), 1998

Wishing and Hoping, 2007

Wishing and Hoping, 2007

Bio
Tracey Baran was born in 1975 in Bath, a small rural town in western New York State. In 1993, when she arrived in New York City to attend the School of Visual Arts, she began to define and record the story of her life in pictures of herself, her family, and friends, and the rustic landscape of her childhood. Possessing an unusual blend of candor and empathy, her photographs intermingle spontaneously-recorded moments with posed and directed depictions that resonate with intense feeling, a painterly sensibility and her consummate skill as a color printer.

Tracey Baran’s first one-person exhibition took place in 1998 at the Liebman Magnan Gallery in New York. She had six additional solo shows, including a 2002 exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, and participated in more than thirty group shows at galleries and museums throughout the world, including, among others, the Guggenheim Museum (New York and Bilbao), the Folkwang Museum, Essen; P.S. 1/MoMA, New York; The Milwaukee Art Museum; and the Pusan Metropolitan Art Museum, Korea.

She was the recipient of several grants and awards including the Henry Buhl Foundation Grant (first prize) in 2002, the Aaron Siskind Foundation Individual Photographer’s Fellowship in 2005, and the Santa Fe Center for Photography Juror’s Choice Grant in 2006. Her work is included in the collections of the Hessel Museum of Art at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY; the Milwaukee Art Museum; the Miami Art Museum, and other institutions. www.tonkonow.com | www.mocp.org.

LACMA Presents Carolyn Drake

 
Border crossing, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Border crossing, Kyrgyzstan 2007


Paradise Rivers
Curated by Sarah Bay Williams

Carolyn Drake’s photos catch the late afternoon light that lingers in piercing clarity before the day goes dark. Her subjects, when not in a state of waiting repose, are seen caught between moments—documented in the midst of action. The photos shown here, part of an ongoing project titled Paradise Rivers, illustrate in light and form the uncertain futures of the former Soviet republics of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan, independent nations since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Drake has been photographing this part of Central Asia and its relationship to the land and water with a traveler’s curiosity and a keen eye that expresses how these countries are coping with vibrant histories, economic and ecological distress, and political uncertainty.

Artist Statement | Carolyn Drake

Medieval Islamic writings call the Sayhoun and Jayhoun rivers two of the four rivers of Paradise.  The water they yield has sustained human life for 40,000 years, providing pastures for nomadic herders, irrigation for farmers, and enabling the development of culture, trade, language, literature, and in parallel, a succession of wars and imperial conquests from east and west over the centuries.

After incorporating the region into its empire in 1917, the Soviet government began transforming the rivers into a web of irrigation canals that brought cotton production to the area on a massive scale. Such large quantities of water were diverted that the Aral Sea, once the world’s fourth largest inland sea, began to disappear, leaving salt and dust storms in its place. When Moscow’s rule ended in 1991, five new Central Asian nations appeared, burdened with plunging economies, artificial borders, and a growing environmental crisis.

This project follows the rivers from their source in the Pamir and Tien Shen mountains, downstream, and across borders to their dwindling ends at the Aral Sea basin, crossing into the lives of people and layers of history that they intersect along the way. The journey reveals Central Asia as a place where the connection between the earth and human life is at once plainly visible and complex, where human yearning and time come together, and progress is not bound to a linear path.

Border Guard, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Border Guard, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Covered woman, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Covered woman, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Trucker hotel, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Trucker hotel, Kyrgyzstan 2007

Pilgrimage meal, Turkmenistan 2009

Pilgrimage meal, Turkmenistan 2009

Khujand, Tajikistan 2009

Khujand, Tajikistan 2009

Mineral Bath, Tajikistan 2008

Mineral Bath, Tajikistan 2008

Lada, Uzbekistan 2008

Lada, Uzbekistan 2008

Home with cotton, Uzbekistan 2008

Home with cotton, Uzbekistan 2008

Swimmer, Turkmenistan 2009

Swimmer, Turkmenistan 2009

Bathers, Tajikistan 2008

Bathers, Tajikistan 2008

Sanatorium, Tajikistan 2008

Sanatorium, Tajikistan 2008

Bio
Carolyn Drake was born in California, USA in 1971. She studied history and media/culture at Brown University, graduating in 1994, and later learned photography at ICP and Ohio University. Her photo career began at the age of 30, when she decided to leave her multimedia job in New York to learn about the world through personal experience. She currently lives in Istanbul and has been the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to Ukraine, a World Press Photo award, the Lange Taylor Prize, and a Santa Fe prize finalist. carolyndrake.com.

Sarah Bay Williams is the Ralph M. Parsons Fellow in the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art where she served as picture editor for the virtual exhibition and print-on-demand book, Celebrating Urban Light. She is the author of The Digital Shoebox: How to Organize, Find and Share Your Digital Photos (2009). Previously, Sarah was head of the communications photography department at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The Wallis Annenberg Photography Department of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, founded in 1984 through an endowment by the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, has a collection of approximately twelve thousand works. The collection maintains a primary emphasis on work produced internationally since 1940. In keeping with the encyclopedic nature of the museum, however, the department’s holdings include examples of photographic art from the medium’s invention in 1839 to the present. With the groundbreaking gift from the Wallis Annenberg Foundation in 2008, the museum acquired the Marjorie and Leonard Vernon Collection, a group of over 3500 prints that forms one of the finest histories of photography and collections of masterworks from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. lacma.org.

Annabel Clark

 
Before the News, 25 November 2002

Before the News, 25 November 2002


Journal: A Mother and Daughter’s Recovery from Breast Cancer
A few days before Christmas of 2002, my mother shared the news that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. I was devastated, having lived with the impression that cancer was a death sentence. I began to imagine what she would look like without hair and a breast.  And as the idea was forming, she asked if I would photograph her.  I felt that if we turned the disease into a project, it would become less scary.  We could objectify and observe it. And if we could anticipate the completion of the project, then we could anticipate the end of the disease.

I photographed my mother over the next year, documenting her recovery from a full mastectomy, chemotherapy treatments and radiation. I knew that she had always kept a journal, and I saw her writing in one throughout treatment. So I asked to use her words to give the photographs a voice and with her permission, put together a book of images accompanied by her text. My photographs and her journal entries tell a parallel story of an illness that I now look back on as something we were lucky to go through.
While they highlight upsetting moments of vulnerability and hopelessness, they also show her incredible will to overcome this disease with both strength and grace. My mother’s will to live has been empowering for me and, I hope, will be for other women and their families who are battling cancer. This experience has shown me who my mother really is, and it has brought us together in ways I never could have imagined.

This is our journal.

Surgical Drains, 17 January 2003

Surgical Drains, 17 January 2003

Friday, 14 January 2003

I couldn’t write yesterday because I was in Morphine Land.   But anyway-my op went fine.   Some of the best moments were being with my group waiting to go in.   Laughing, loving, then up in the room in and out of consciousness.   Benjy came.   My beautiful Benjy.   My Annabel slept with me on the pull out chair bed.   I’ve seen my scar–it isn’t bad at all.   The only worry is what is my future prognosis.   How much chemo, etc.

I’m feeling really good–my scar doesn’t freak me out–I’m ok–I’m ok.   Everyone is so nice here.

Going Home, 18 January 2003

Going Home, 18 January 2003

Sunday, 19 January 2003

As Annabel and I left the hospital we were helped by William, who had earlier brought me my paper and my breakfast.   Waiting for the elevator I started to cry.   “One day at a time” he said.   “One day at a time.   My Mom had cancer” he said, “so I’ve been on both sides of this.”

On the Subway, 10 February 2003

On the Subway, 10 February 2003

Stretch, 12 February 2003

Stretch, 12 February 2003

Blizzard, 17 February 2003

Blizzard, 17 February 2003

Injections in Bed, 09 March 2003

Injections in Bed, 09 March 2003

Birthday Cake, 09 March 2003

Birthday Cake, 09 March 2003

Balloons, 09 March 2003

Balloons, 09 March 2003

Monday, 10 March 2003

The birthday was wonderful.   To live in my memory of all those weird, emotional, happy, strange times that have happened to me in the new life…

…Yesterday, Sunday–The second gloriously sunny day in a row.   Then I went to church.   Once again pastor Melinda somehow managed to come up with the sermon that I most needed to hear.   About holding anger towards someone.   About forgiving?   Forgetting.   I really like her and really like this church.   It’s a wonderful haven for me.   I don’t know whether I’ve found God and Jesus yet.   But the comfort of shared prayer and company and singing and praying and focusing is healing and nourishing.

Radiation Table, 17 June 2003

Radiation Table, 17 June 2003

Wednesday, 18 June 2003

So here is what happened.   Came with Annabel yesterday for what was going to be the dry run radiation but they decided to go ahead and treat me anyway.   First though, I had to lay still for over an hour.   In my cast.   At first its fine but then the fingers of my right hand go dead.   Then Annabel rubs it.   Much better but now my arm then neck, then head, turned to one side, begin to really really hurt.   Mustn’t move.   The technicians purposefully stride in and out.   Putting in film, moving the big machine.   Each time they leave, the radioactive proof door closes automatically.   I’m alone in there with a loud machine.   They can see me on a monitor, but I am alone.   Annabel of course has to also leave the room.   Whoever designed the treatment rooms has thoughtfully painted flowers on the ceiling.   It’s all very high tech, but they have definitely tried their best to make it patient friendly.   And the people are really nice.

In the Pool, 23 June 2003

In the Pool, 23 June 2003

Saturday, 28 June 2003

The sweltering heat of the last few days has cooled off and I have had two very happy days…

Suddenly I feel less fearful.   What will be will be.   The fear of early death seems lifted.   I feel good. I feel happy.   My 9 radiations are beginning to look a little red–but really not all that bad.   It’s easy to close my eyes under the machines and go somewhere else inside myself.   I’m not on the table.   I’m not being nuked, I’m off with my loved ones.   My ability to do this has grown during this funny old journey.   By the side of the stage each performance at Talking Heads, my ghosts visit.   Dad, Mum, Nanny, Vanessa, Corin, Robert Stephens, Noel Coward.   They send me out there calm and ready.

Survivor, 10 August 2003

Survivor, 10 August 2003

Wednesday, 12 November 2003

Had my 4 month check up yesterday and all is well.   My face feels relaxed and peaceful.   My scar squeezes, but that tells me I am alive.

Bio
Annabel Clark was born in Topanga Canyon, California in 1981.  She received her B.F.A. in Photography from Parsons School of Design in 2003.  During her final term at Parsons, she photographed her mother, actress Lynn Redgrave, during treatment and recovery from breast cancer.  In 2004, the project was published as a six-page spread in the New York Times Magazine and then as the award-winning book Journal: A Mother and Daughter’s Recovery from Breast Cancer, by Umbrage Editions.  Her work has been exhibited at the Minnesota Center for Photography, Peer Gallery and The National Arts Club as well as hospitals and medical schools across the U.S.  Her editorial work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Observer, Marie Claire, Glamour, Redbook and Proto Magazine.  Clark was the 2008 recipient of the Albina Taddeo Humanitarian Award from the Sass Foundation for her contribution to breast cancer awareness.  She also teaches photography workshops at the Creative Center, a nonprofit organization that provides free art classes to people living with cancer.  website.

Lynne Cohen

 
Untitled (Submarines)

Untitled (Submarines)

 

Cover
For more than thirty years, Lynne Cohen has been photographing interior spaces devoid of people – laboratories, health spas, waiting rooms, classrooms. Their décor, sometimes kitschy, often funny, even if the humour reinforces the aspect of suspense, even of uneasiness. The rigorous framing, the distancing always much the same, the light that puts things in relief and the colour make the images seem constructed. By elaborating on the seemingly fictional quality of the spaces, the purposes of which are frequently ill-defined, Lynne Cohen plays up an aspect of social control, one that makes itself apparent in strange ways. The title of the book plays with multiple means of the English word ‘Cover’, which can mean lid, embellishment, protection or concealment. It refers to the book itself, a cross between documentary photography and contemporary art, sense and nonsense, the ordinary and dream-like. After Camouflage in 2005, Cover is the second book Cohen has published with Le Point du Jour. It brings together colour work from the past 10 years.

Untitled (Map Ladder)

Untitled (Map Ladder)

Untitled (Piano Window)

Untitled (Piano Window)

Untitled (Underwater Bedspg)

Untitled (Underwater Bedspg)

Untitled (Olympic Shooters)

Untitled (Olympic Shooters)

Untitled (Yellow Chairs)

Untitled (Yellow Chairs)

Untitled (Russian Target)

Untitled (Russian Target)

Untitled (Mutant Lamps)

Untitled (Mutant Lamps)

Untitled (Spaceship)

Untitled (Spaceship)

Untitled (Camouflage)

Untitled (Camouflage)

Untitled (Cats Paws)

Untitled (Cats Paws)

Untitled (Empty Pool)

Untitled (Empty Pool)

Untitled (Astroturf)

Untitled (Astroturf)

Untitled (Spawaves)

Untitled (Spawaves)

untitled (Dog)

untitled (Dog)

Untitled (Gun Wires)

Untitled (Gun Wires)

Bio
Since the early 1970s Cohen has been photographing living rooms, men’s clubs, classrooms, spas and military installations. Trained as a sculptor and printmaker, when Pop Art and Minimalism were dominant in the art world, she has a long-standing interest in the artificial and the everyday. She focuses on the psychological, sociological and political aspects of her subjects. But primarily she is concerned with the way things appear and function in our lives. As she once observed, “I feel as if the world can’t be like it is. It seems full of finished works of art.” The disorientation her photographs provoke is largely the result of the specific and mysterious nature of the places she photographs with their odd symmetries and disjunctions. Her work is marked by a strong visual and formal sense, one that conspires with the content to get under one’s skin. In conjunction with her art work, she has conducted workshops in Europe and North America and was for some thirty years a university teacher both in Canada and the United States. A major retrospective exhibition (accompanied by a new book, Cover) will open in July 2009 in Cherbourg at Le Point du Jour. website.

Erica Allen: 2009 WIP–LTI/Lightside Materials Grant Recipient

 

Untitled Gentlemen
Untitled Gentlemen is a series of fictional portraits created using anonymous faces from contemporary barbershop hairstyle posters, combined with figures from discarded studio photographs. 

Through interventions in these found photographs, this work explores representations and constructions of identity in portraiture, while appropriating value to images and individuals who are otherwise overlooked.

Existing between the real and artificial, these images subvert the meaning and expectations of the traditional studio portrait, creating an unknown narrative and expressive ambiguity in an unexpected context. 

Once primarily functional photographs, these barbershop portraits become unusually candid and vulnerable representations of masculinity.  Adopting new identities while remaining anonymous, these new portraits are known only by the hairstyle number found on the original poster.

I am interested in shifting the frame of how we encounter and interpret images to investigate the meaning and construction of the photograph. This series encourages the viewer to reflect upon ideas of representation and projections of identity in photography. 

Bio
Erica Allen is a Brooklyn based artist originally from Oakland, California. She received her MFA in Photography, Video and Related Media from the School of Visual Arts. Awards for her work also include the Aaron Siskind Scholarship, Daylight Photo Awards Juror’s choice and residency at the Vermont Studio Center. Her work has been featured in the Visual Arts Journal, Photograph, The New Yorker, Marie Claire, Outlook, PDN, Zing and Esopus magazine. She has exhibited at The Center for Fine Art Photography, The Camera Club of New York, The Center for Photography at Woodstock, with the Humble Arts Foundation and Higher Pictures. Untitled Gentlemen is included in the Beinecke Library collection at Yale University. She more here.

Erika Larsen: 2009 WIP-LTI/Lightside Individual Project Grant Recipient

 

Sami, The People
I have seen the Arctic as a place where the extremes play out in the daily lives of the people that inhabit this land. It is a place where man has learned to adapt to the environment that surrounds him rather than adapting the environment to him. Here I found the Sámi, which translates to ‘The People.’ They are the indigenous people living in the Arctic Circle region of northern Scandinavia and it is the largest area in the world with an ancestral way of life based on the seasonal migrations of the animals. The Sámi are by tradition reindeer herders and live a nomadic lifestyle based on the reindeer migration.

I have come on a search to understand the primal drive of the modern hunter by taking an inclusive look at an original hunter-gatherer society. I have come to see if when the land speaks there are those that can interpret its language. I have come in search of silence so that I could begin to hear again.

I will spend the next year exploring the Sámi’s symbiotic relationship with the environment. They are the only people who can own and sell wildlife in Scandinavia. By possessing a livelihood that is dependent on their surroundings the Sami are acutely aware of the changes in nature. They have managed to survive in extreme climatic circumstances for ages. I believe that through exploring this culture I will better understand our role as stewards of the earth.

Bio
Erika Larsen’s (American, born 1976) most notable bodies of work, ‘Young Blood’ and ‘The Hunt’ look intimately at hunting culture in North America, its connection with nature and its role in the cycle of life and death. She has been recognized by World Press Photo, American Society of Magazine Editors, American Photography, Society of Photographers, and New Jersey State Council of the Arts. Her work has been exhibited internationally. Erika is currently on a Fulbright fellowship to document the daily life and culture of the Sami people living in the Scandinavian Arctic. website

We are very pleased to present the WIP-Lightside Individual Project Grant to Erika Larsen for her project Sami, The People.

Jessica Backhaus

 
Marlon Brando, 2006. Courtesy of Yancey Richardson Gallery.

Marlon Brando, 2006. Courtesy of Yancey Richardson Gallery.


What Still Remains
The idea for my project “What Still Remains” had been on my mind for quite some time. One morning, on my way to the darkroom, I was crossing Broadway, near Canal street, and in the middle of the street, I saw a clear blue plastic comb embedded in the pavement. That startled me, and I was beginning to wonder how this comb might have gotten there. Who had used it before, why did it end up in the pavement on Broadway? How do things get to where they are? They get lost in time and I am interested in what still remains. In our society of today, marked by our ability to consume, everything seems to be disposable, changes occur so quickly and things get left behind in specific places. Then they seem to take on a life of their own.

Bottle, 2006

Bottle, 2006

Roses and Cables, 2007

Roses and Cables, 2007

Silence, 2008

Silence, 2008

Small Wonder, 2008

Small Wonder, 2008

Pillow, 2007

Pillow, 2007

One Day in November
The images from the series, “One Day in November“ is a tribute to Gisèle Freund on what would have been her 100th birthday in December 2008. “One day in November“ is a testament to the friendship between the great photographer and myself, a young photography student in Paris during the 1990’s. Intended as a posthumous birthday present, I have compiled a collection of images that are meant to convey visually what Gisèle Freund taught me and what Gisèle meant to me. Gisèle Freund herself can certainly be considered as one of the great artistic and intellectual figures of the twentieth century. Her impact can be traced to both her photographic and literary work and to her own colorful biography.

Morning

Morning

Lines

Lines

Spool

Spool

Greenpoint

Greenpoint

Life

Life

Niagara

Niagara

Bio
Jessica Backhaus was born in Cuxhaven, Germany in 1970. At the age of sixteen, she moved to Paris where she studied photography and visual communications. Here she would meet Gisele Freund in 1992, who became her mentor and close friend.

In 1995 her passion for photography drew her to New York, where she started assisting photographers and pursued her own projects. Since then her work has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including The National Portrait Gallery in London and the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin.

In Fall 2005 her first book, “Jesus and the Cherries” was published by Kehrer Verlag, Heidelberg. Fall 2008 brought two new books, both published by Kehrer Verlag. The first titled “What Still Remains” and the second book “One Day in November” which is a visual homage to Gisèle Freund, who would have celebrated her 100th birthday in December 2008.

Jessica Backhaus is represented by Yancey Richardson Gallery in New York, Robert Morat Galerie in Hamburg and The Photographers’ Gallery in London.

While based in New York, Jessica divides her time and life between Europe and the United States. website.

Yisook Sohn

 
Wine and Sup, 2007

Wine and Sup, 2007


Madam C
Seeing is not perceiving what we see through our eyes. It is feeling something invisible, or something that is obviously there, but invisible. The first impression we feel when seeing a person is not merely to see his or her face but to know it as it is. It is not about something, but to know something. Direct Insight into the object.

Do you see the moon when I see the sun? Even if I close my eyes, he is there and I am here. Even though we are near here, we see different things. He comes to me as he is there, and I go to him as I am here. There is something between us. Why do these women do as they are asked? A man acts while a woman is seen? Why do we try to be seen, not to see? My practice to see comes the place where the world of those women is to be seen. Starting from what I see to what you are as seen by somebody else. The chasm between what I view and what those women are seen. The dim gaze that looks at me again.

Most of these photographs were taken in Bundang, a boom town not far from Seoul, the capital of Korea. It seems to me that it is a forgotten city that buried all of its memories, without recollections, and with no flavors of life. Trying to perceive its interior space from a distance, I have found something not unique that we saw somewhere. It appears as a manipulated movie set and a place where happiness is made. In this place there is a slide between dissonance and consonance, which come from relationships between urban space and man.

The world speaks to us as if we may reach when we try for some more. To me, this is like an oasis. Saying it is what I want, I reach out my hands, but it is like a mirage, which is not attainable.

Always and Forever, 2008

Always and Forever, 2008

Morning Makeup, 2007

Morning Makeup, 2007

Gold Living Room, 2007

Gold Living Room, 2007

A Room with a View, 2006

A Room with a View, 2006

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, 2006

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, 2006

Overshadowing, 2006

Overshadowing, 2006

White House, 2007

White House, 2007

Nobody but You, 2006

Nobody but You, 2006

Iris Wallpaper, 2006

Iris Wallpaper, 2006

Lady in a Chiffon Blouse, 2007

Lady in a Chiffon Blouse, 2007

Proportion, 2006

Proportion, 2006

Bio
Yisook Sohn lives and works in Seoul, Korea. She received her BA in Korean literature from the Ewha Woman’s University and completed her MFA course in photography from the Graduate School of Sangmyung University at Seoul in 2007. She had her first solo exhibition this April. website.

Gabriela Bulisova

 
Home décor. Cluster bomb ammunition. Lebanon, 2006

Home décor. Cluster bomb ammunition. Lebanon, 2006


My lens is not dispassionate – I am an advocate. I carry my camera to the world’s marginalized places – like Chernobyl, Azerbaijan, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria.

Many of my projects bring to light the very real consequences of human tragedies that have been extensively covered up or have faded from view. We all know that the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident was one of the most devastating industrial accidents in history. But there has been a shocking lack of attention to its long-term impact, including extensive ecological, medical, economic, socio-political and cultural consequences. My project titled “Half Lives and Half Truths” brings the very real consequences back into the public sphere.

The 2006 Lebanon War made headlines for a short period, then faded quickly from public view. My project titled “After War” documents the lesser-known consequences of the indiscriminate use of cluster bomb ammunition on southern Lebanon. This collaborative project, relying on photographs of and interviews with cluster bomb victims or their families, seeks to overcome the lack of media attention to the extensive violence and loss of life that occurred after the war was technically over.

An ongoing documentary project titled “Guests” focuses attention on Iraqi refugees who fled the war and sectarian violence and relocated to Damascus, Syria. The number of Iraqis displaced either internally or externally is now estimated at more than 5 million, making it one of the greatest refugee crises in modern history. Yet this story barely registers in the U.S. mainstream media and receives almost no attention from policymakers in Washington.

When I meet, interview, and photograph those living daily in unimaginable hardship and despair, I am often overcome by my own inability to do more to respond. But the dignity, resilience, and persevering humanity of these individuals leaves me with no other choice but to cling to the belief that, with pictures, one can ultimately alleviate pain and rally support for social justice.

Young widow at her husband’s grave. Lebanon, 2006

Young widow at her husband’s grave. Lebanon, 2006

Photograph of a grandfather…all that remained after bombing. Lebanon, 2006

Photograph of a grandfather…all that remained after bombing. Lebanon, 2006

Victims of bombing. Lebanon, 2006

Victims of bombing. Lebanon, 2006

Mother of a gravely ill Chernobyl liquidator—a person responsible for clean up of the 1986 exploded nuclear reactor. Belarus, 2003

Mother of a gravely ill Chernobyl liquidator—a person responsible for clean up of the 1986 exploded nuclear reactor. Belarus, 2003

Hydrocephalic child, Minsk orphanage. Belarus, 2003 (in memoriam)

Hydrocephalic child, Minsk orphanage. Belarus, 2003 (in memoriam)

Gregory refused to evacuate his contaminated village of Bartolomeyevka. Belarus, 2003

Gregory refused to evacuate his contaminated village of Bartolomeyevka. Belarus, 2003

Yulia after thyroid surgery. Ukraine, 2005

Yulia after thyroid surgery. Ukraine, 2005

Iraqi refugee, a young widow whose husband was killed, visits the sea for the first time since her arrival to Syria several months ago. Tartus, Syria, 2008

Iraqi refugee, a young widow whose husband was killed, visits the sea for the first time since her arrival to Syria several months ago. Tartus, Syria, 2008

Iraqi refugee whose brother was killed and father was a target of sectarian violence, stands in front of her family’s belongings in Damascus. Syria, 2008

Iraqi refugee whose brother was killed and father was a target of sectarian violence, stands in front of her family’s belongings in Damascus. Syria, 2008

Iraqi refugee, pregnant after 15 years of marriage, sits in her bare apartment. Damascus, Syria, 2008

Iraqi refugee, pregnant after 15 years of marriage, sits in her bare apartment. Damascus, Syria, 2008

Mother with a photograph of her son, a target of religious violence. Damascus, Syria, 2008

Mother with a photograph of her son, a target of religious violence. Damascus, Syria, 2008

An undocumented and desperate Iraqi refugee faces financial hardship and possible deportation. Damascus, Syria, 2008

An undocumented and desperate Iraqi refugee faces financial hardship and possible deportation. Damascus, Syria, 2008

Bio
Gabriela Bulisova is a documentary photographer from the former Czechoslovakia, currently based in Washington, DC.

She has received numerous recognitions and awards, including: the Corcoran School of Art and Design Faculty Grant Award; the Aperture Portfolio Review Top Tier Portfolios of Merit; the CEC ArtsLink Projects grant; the Puffin Foundation Grant; the PDN Annual Photography Competition Winner in Student Category award; and the CANON “Explorer of Light” award. Bulisova was a participant at the Eddie Adams Workshop for emerging photographers and a graduate fellow at the National Graduate Photography Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY.

Bulisova teaches photography and photojournalism courses at George Mason University in Virginia and the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, DC.  She is a member of the Metro Collective Photographic Agency and the Women Photojournalists of Washington.  In 2005, Bulisova was awarded the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Photography and Digital Imaging from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Baltimore. website.

Talia Chetrit

 
Cube Corner, 2008 | Images courtesy of Renwick Gallery

Cube Corner, 2008 | Images courtesy of Renwick Gallery


Reading
Photography records optical space. Its basic elements are light and time. I reduce my subject to these elements to investigate photography’s inherent properties and how we perceive and categorize this medium. Some of my subjects are created through the act of photographing. Others are illusions of or metaphors for light and time. How can the basic tools of light and space move us? How can we encounter them in new ways?

The title of my series Reading refers to the act of interpreting visual stimuli. These photographs are about seeing an image and understanding it—its formal complexity or the manner in which it was made. Reading uses experimentations with perception and abstraction to look at photography itself—its ability to transform that which already exists or to create new existence.

Triangle, 2008

Triangle, 2008

Cube, 2008

Cube, 2008

Paper, 2008

Paper, 2008

Rainbow, 2008

Rainbow, 2008

Spectrum, 2008

Spectrum, 2008

Primary Colors Flashed at Black, 2008

Primary Colors Flashed at Black, 2008

Primary Colors Flashed at White, 2008

Primary Colors Flashed at White, 2008

Fire, 2008

Fire, 2008

Sun, 2008

Sun, 2008

Moon, 2008

Moon, 2008

Bio
Talia Chetrit lives and works in New York, New York. She received her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2008 and previously earned her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. website.