Laura Heyman

 
Stefanie Yvens, Grand Rue, May 2010

Stefanie Yvens, Grand Rue, May 2010


Pa Bouje Ankò: Dont Move Again
Pa Bouje Ankò: Dont Move Again began with the following question; “Can someone from the first world see/photograph within the third world without voyeurism or objectification?” In November 2009, I began to test this query by opening a formal portrait studio in the Grand Rue neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, and inviting members of the local community to have their portraits made. Shot with an 810 camera, the photographs follow the example of artists like Mike Disfarmer, James VanDer Zee and Seydou Keita, who used the commercial and utilitarian aspects of their practice to portray their subjects with a consideration and respect that is both clear-eyed and beautiful.

I was highly conscious of everything that stood in the way of a real exchange between myself and those who sat for a portrait; race, class, opportunity and lack of opportunity, the ability to move freely through the world. These things make communication difficult, as they are ever present, but rarely discussed. Because I was aware of the current and past difficulties between Haiti and the United States, I felt compelled to control the context of the images, not show them beyond Haiti, and leave their circulation in the hands of their subjects. I was afraid the images would be misconstrued or changed once they were removed from their original environment, and wanted to avoid enacting the familiar and problematic situation wherein the first world artist takes home a photograph of “the other” as souvenir. What I did not realize at the time was that this very idea that the context of the images was something I could designate or control was exactly what I sought to avoid. It was, in fact, both colonial and paternalistic. The context of any artwork is constantly shifting, and the context of these particular images has now shifted again. In addition to whatever they were initially, after the earthquake, the images have become both record and memorial. That event has also shifted the focus of the project, which has evolved to include various rapidly expanding communities in Port-Au-Prince. Reconstruction has introduced a new population: United Nations officials, NGO employees, volunteers, business investors, and local politicians. The first of these non-Haitian subjects I photographed was the U.S. Infantry, in May 2010. Pa Bouje Ankò is at once a request for stillness and an acknowledgement of the impossibility of that request, both for the work and its subjects. The project demands conceptual flexibility, an open mind, and an ability to function in a constant state of flux.

Leni Exavier and Joshue Brounache, Grand Rue December 2009

Leni Exavier and Joshue Brounache, Grand Rue December 2009

Gerlot Batravil and his baby, Champ Mars, March 2010

Gerlot Batravil and his baby, Champ Mars, March 2010

Margaret Denis, Grand Rue, December 2009

Margaret Denis, Grand Rue, December 2009

Timoun-Rezistans; Leonce Love, Alex Louis, Londel Innocent, Evans Richelieu, Makendy Louis, Grand Rue, November 2009

Timoun-Rezistans; Leonce Love, Alex Louis, Londel Innocent, Evans Richelieu, Makendy Louis, Grand Rue, November 2009

Jean Pierre Dadel, Champ Mars, March 2010

Jean Pierre Dadel, Champ Mars, March 2010

Michel Lafleur, Ricardo Derival and Casseus Claudel, Grand Rue, March, 2010

Michel Lafleur, Ricardo Derival and Casseus Claudel, Grand Rue, March, 2010

Slay DeRosier, Grand Rue, March 2010

Slay DeRosier, Grand Rue, March 2010

Blondine Herard, Polycarpe Racine, Marriot Herard and Dachmine Herard, Grand Rue, December 2009

Blondine Herard, Polycarpe Racine, Marriot Herard and Dachmine Herard, Grand Rue, December 2009

Bio
Laura Heyman is an artist and curator who has exhibited at The Deutsch Polen Institute, Darmstadt, Germany, Ampersand International Arts, San Francisco, California, Light Work Gallery, Syracuse, New York, P.S. 122, New York, NY, Senko Studio, Viborg, Denmark, and The National Portrait Gallery, London, UK. Her work has been published in Contact Sheet, The Photo Review and Frontiers. She is the recipient of a NYFA Strategic Opportunity Stipend and a Light Work Artist Grant. Her most recent curatorial project, “Who’s Afraid of America” featuring the work of Justyna Badach, Larry Clark, Cheryl Dunn, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Zoe Strauss and and Tobin Yelland, was exhibited at Wonderland Art Space, in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Colleen Plumb

 
Rubens’ Dogs, 1999

Rubens’ Dogs, 1999


Animals Are Outside Today
In 1928, Henry Beston stated regarding animals in his book, The Outermost House: “They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of the earth.” Animals Are Outside Today is a journey examining underneath this net, offering us the chance to contemplate our intersections with animals and consider the multi-layered impact humans have on other living beings. Contradictions define our relationships with animals. We love and admire them; we are entertained and fascinated by them; we take our children to watch and learn about them. Animals are embedded within core human history—evident in our stories, rituals and symbols. At the same time, we eat, wear and cage them with seeming indifference, consuming them, and their images, in countless ways. Our connection to animals today is often developed through assimilation and appropriation; we absorb them into our lives, yet we no longer know of their origin. Most people are cut off from the steps involved in their processing or acquisition, shielded from witnessing their death or decay. This work moves within these contradictions, always questioning if the notion of the sacred, and the primal connection to Nature that animals convey and inspire, will survive alongside our evolution.

Plumb’s first monograph entitled Animals Are Outside Today, has just been released by Radius Books. For more info visit their site.

Burying Jack, 2009

Burying Jack, 2009

Trapped Bird, 2005

Trapped Bird, 2005

buffalo farm, 2008

buffalo farm, 2008

Fox and Boy , 2001

Fox and Boy , 2001

Procyon Lotor, 1999

Procyon Lotor, 1999

St. Scholastica Monkey Fetus, 2009

St. Scholastica Monkey Fetus, 2009

flamingo, 2000

flamingo, 2000

Pig roast , 2005

Pig roast , 2005

Central Park Zoo, 2009

Central Park Zoo, 2009

Oiled Sea Turtle, Louisiana, 2010

Oiled Sea Turtle, Louisiana, 2010

Daniel ’s Lions, 2005

Daniel ’s Lions, 2005

Elephant House, 2000

Elephant House, 2000

Bio
Born and raised in Chicago, Colleen Plumb worked as a graphic designer for several years before earning her MFA in photography at Columbia College Chicago (1999). For the past 14 years she has been working on a series of photographs about animals and the myriad ways that we’ve integrated them into our lives. Her work is held in several collections including the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, Milwaukee Art Museum, the Southeast Museum of Photography in Daytona Beach, Florida, and Fidelity Investments in Boston. Her photographs are part of the Midwest Photographers Project at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Chicago Project at Catherine Edelman Gallery, and are featured in Photo- Eye’s Photographer’s Showcase. Currently, Plumb has a solo show on view at Jen Bekman Gallery in New York, and in Mayshe will have a solo exhibit at Dina Mitrani Gallery in Miami. Her photographs have been exhibited in numerous one-person and group exhibitions including Museum of Contemporary Photography, Milwaukee Art Museum, van Straaten Gallery in Denver, and Photographic Center Northwest in Seattle. Plumb’s work has appeared in many publications including PDN and HotShoe International, among others. She currently teaches in the Photography Department at Columbia College Chicago. website.

Tealia Ellis Ritter

 
My dream is to realize who I truly am, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is to realize who I truly am, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

The Live Creature and Ethereal Things
The specific genesis of, The Live Creature and Ethereal Things, was my family’s move to suburban Chicago. I found myself an outsider in a town where I knew no one. This created in me a heightened awareness of how I looked and how people looked at me. I began to experience a conscious and constant feeling of being on display.

The Live Creature and Ethereal Things, chronicles the people that pass in and out of my daily life, including both friends and family, but is primarily comprised of strangers I approach on the street. My interests lie in exploring, in both a physical and emotional sense, the ways in which people choose to present themselves, and their environment, when they know they are going to be on display. Specifically focusing on the nature of longing, self-consciousness and image as a construction. Stylistically the images are inspired by European society portraits, which convey a sense of the sitter as part of a tableau created to be examined. As a culture now in the age of facebook and social networking, we are aware of our projected selves in a new way and the methods by which photographs can be used to shape people’s perceptions. There exists simultaneously the person that we are and the person we want to be, our self-presentation often dealing more with aspirations than reality. Each subject is allowed to dress in any way they would like and choose a setting they feel comfortable in, but the final image is a negotiation between my vision of the individual and the image of themselves they are working to project. At the end of the photo session, I give each subject the opportunity to write down a dream, although they are not required to do so. The dream statements allow for a parallel declaration to be made solely by the subjects, in the form of words rather than through their image. The meaning of “dream” is left up to the subjects to determine.

Colt dueling pistols, 2010, Archival Piezo Print

Colt dueling pistols, 2010, Archival Piezo Print

David, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

David, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is to be an artist, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is to be an artist, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

My dream was about a death, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

My dream was about a death, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

Peach bedroom, 2009, Archival Piezo Print

Peach bedroom, 2009, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is that my entire family can share heaven with me, 2008, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is that my entire family can share heaven with me, 2008, Archival Piezo Print

Joe, 2009, Archival Piezo Print

Joe, 2009, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is to be famous, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

My dream is to be famous, 2007, Archival Piezo Print

Bio
Tealia Ellis Ritter was born in Illinois in 1978. She was given her first camera, a Canon F-1, at the age of six by her father. After attending Columbia College Chicago, where she completed her BA in Fine Art Photography, she earned her MFA at the University of Iowa with a major in Fine Art Photography and a minor in Printmaking. Her work has been exhibited internationally, most recently by Taschen NYC, the Magenta Foundation as a part of Flash Forward 2009, at Humble Arts “31 Under 31” exhibition, the Griffin Museum, The Photographic Center Northwest and in the multimedia project, “Pause to Begin.” She now lives and works in the Chicago area with her husband Dave, their son Finn and dog Zoe. website

Shadi Ghadirian

 


Qajar
In the series Qajar, I tried to reconstruct the atmosphere of a previous era by using old backdrops. My models, chosen among close family and friends, are shown wearing clothes from the turn of the 20th century and are carrying objects, mostly smuggled, into contemporary Iran.

When I was working on this series of photographs, I had just graduated and the duality and contradiction of life at that time provided the motive for me to display this contrast: a woman who one can not say to what time she belongs; a photograph from two eras; a woman who is dazed; a woman who is not connected to the objects in her possession.

Bio
Shadi Ghadirian was born in 1974 in Tehran, Iran. She is a photographer who continues to live and work in Iran. Ghadirian studied photography at Azad University (in Tehran). After finishing her B. A., Ghadirian began her professional career as a photographer. Currently, Ghadirian works at the Museum of Photography in Tehran.

Her work is intimately linked to her identity as a Muslim woman living in Iran. Nonetheless, her art also deals with issues relevant to women living in other parts of the world. She questions the role of women in society and explores ideas of censorship, religion, modernity, and the status of women. Her work has been exhibited in museums and galleries across Europe, and the U.S.A. She has also been featured in print and electronic media (including the New York Times, Photography Now, the Daily Telegraph, the BBC and others). Her work is in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others. website

Bieke Depoorter

 


Oe Menia with me
I am looking for a place to spend the night. Do you know people who would have a bed, or a couch? I don’t need anything in particular, and I have a sleeping-bag. I prefer not to stay in a hotel, because I don’t have a lot of money and because I want to see the way people live in Russia. Could I stay at your place, perhaps? Thank you very much for your help!

For three periods of one month, I have let the Trans-Siberian train guide me alongside forgotten villages, from living room to living room. Some Russian words, scribbled on a little piece of paper, allowed me to be welcomed and absorbed in the warm chaos of a family. Accidental encounters led me to the places where I could sleep. The living room, the epicentre of their life, establishes an intimate contact between the Russian inhabitants. In this room, they sleep, eat, drink, cry, Here everything happens. For a brief moment, I was part of this. Their couch became my bed for one night. This way, I experienced transient, but very powerful, shared moments.

Bio
Bieke Depoorter was born in Kortrijk on the 29th of August 1986. She graduated at KASK in 2009 with a series on Russia, which immediately won some prizes. website.

Angela Strassheim: 2010 WIP-LTI/Lightside Individual Project Grant Recipient

 

Evidence
Perhaps we have all processed a question in certain love relationships: Could we be a victim of violence or perform an act of violence against a loved one out of our immense capacity to feel jealousy, anger, rage, and desperation in a moment of extreme emotion?  These photographs allow for the viewer to entertain the idea that this situation could involve anyone of us. My past work in forensic photography, both photographing crime-scenes and documentation for DNA collection, led me to this project.

Evidence is a group of photographs taken at homes where familial homicides have occurred.  Long after the struggles have ended in these spaces, despite the cleaning, repainting and subsequent re-habitation of these homes, the “Blue Star” solution activates the physical memory of blood through its contact with the remaining DNA proteins on the walls. The black and white images are long exposures – from ten minutes to one hour – with minimal ambient night light pouring in from the crevices of windows and doors, capturing the physical presence of blood as a lurid glow.

The color images were taken upon arrival at each home in which there were approximately 140 different visited locations across the U.S. These photographs are evidence that I was physically present at the homes that I researched. They represent the mystery inside a box that is unattainable in a physical sense.  Each image title is a list of the murder weapons used, with-holding names and the gory details of the events.

The crime scene is presented on two levels; it is both an accurate, tragic, and dramatic transcription of the event and a mysterious backdrop onto which one can project their imagination.

Bio
American, b. 1969, Bloomfield, Iowa; lives and works in New York.  2003 MFA, Photography, Yale University, New Haven, CT .1997 Forensic & Biomedical Photography Certification, Metro-Dade County, Forensic Imaging Bureau, Miami, Fl.1995 BFA, Media Arts, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Minneapolis, MN.  Featured in the 2006 Whitney Biennial and Musee d’ Elysee 50-reGeneration exhibition. Nationally and internationally exhibited in solo and group exhibitions.  Collected by museums and various private collectors. Awards include a Bush Fellowship, McKnight Fellowship, Jerome Fellowship, and an Artist Initiative Grant, was a finalist in 2008 for the Les Recontres D’ Arles International Photography Award.

Angela first pursued a career in Forensic Photography.  Instead, she now directs the camera toward the subject of family and the domestic environment. Her images “vacillate between what is immediately revealed on the surface and the unsettling nature of what is discovered upon further inspection.” In her first series, Left Behind, she took an introspective look at her own upbringing in a born-again Christian home.  In her second series, Pause, she explores what it means to be a daughter and examines the complex dramas that reveal themselves in relationships with the father and other male figures of significance.  In her most recent body of work, Evidence, she photographs in B&W with long exposures.  She has sought out homes where domestic homicides have happened in the past and provides a peek into the world of forensics with her technique to demonstrate the remains of DNA left behind.  This is still ongoing and has expanded to a new body of work about domestic violence.  Currently she is researching a long-term project in Israel that relates to women of the Bible.  

We are proud to announce that the 2nd annual 2010 WIP-LTI/Lightside Individual Project Grant in the amount of $3000 goes to Angela Strassheim for her project Evidence.

Charlott Markus

 


A not so still life (Tabula rasa)
Charlott Markus’ work often takes its inspirations from a specific context or location and with the use of historic references and a symbolic language every little detail in an image or an installation becomes important. Nothing is coincidental in Markus’ work. A precise balance is tangible in the composed entity of Markus: an entity between color and form, order and chaos, narration and abstraction.

She has an interest in playing with layers and perspective, which makes it hard to gauge how individual pieces relate to space. They become less like photography and more like paintings or sculptural collages. Markus uses things that are found in and related to a specific space or she search for remnants related to a specific topic elsewhere when doing studio work. The collected objects are re-composed into balanced formations, many times almost abstract. The way she works is not only investigating space, color and form but an indirect investigation into relations and structures.

The below series ‘A not so still life (Tabula Rasa)’ shows still lifes that are built out of blank and crumbled, old and new pieces of paper. The work was inspired by tabula rasa theories that have circulated and been debated for centuries. The term Tabula rasa means a blank slate, a slate with no info, it is clean. It is the epistemological theory that individuals are born without built-in mental content and that their knowledge comes from experience and perception, a nature versus nurture debate.

Bio
Charlott Markus is Swedish by birth but currently living and working in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. After graduating the Photography Department of the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam 2007 Markus has actively been exhibiting in the Netherlands and abroad. Recent exhibition venues include among others FOAM (Amsterdam), LM Projects (Los Angeles), Nest (Den Haag), Huis Marseille / Museum of Photography (Amsterdam) and Irish Museum of Contemporary Art (Dublin). Markus construct still lives and arrangements that predominantly end up as a photographic series and often as site-specific spatial pieces. Website

Anna Beeke: 2012 WIP–LTI/Lightside Materials Grant Recipient

 

Untitled
My series of images about the forest began in a rather fanciful and serendipitous way:
Knowing I had been conceived in Washington State, but never having travelled to the Pacific Northwest, I was recently struck by the compulsion to go to the place where I began life and the conviction that if I did, I would surely find something there. What I discovered, or re-discovered, was the forest, and within it a more imaginative mindset. I grew up, like so many countless others, on the Brothers Grimm and various related fairy tales and myths. The forest plays a major role in the majority of these stories: as a place of enchantment, the landscape of an epic journey or the fulfillment of a quest, but also as the unknown, a dark and dangerous place outside the bounds of normal society where anything can happen, the battleground of good and evil. I am interested less in specific tales and more in the perceived mystery, magic, and danger of the forest, how these ideas have been constructed in our collective consciousness, and how they are reflected in contemporary reality. My working method follows the structure of many of these stories: I go into the forest seeking adventure and the unknown. Small moments of magic and surprise, delight and fear, and chance encounters with strangers along the way inform my direction; my experiences in the forest become not myth or written tale, but the images in this body of work.

Though I come from a photojournalistic training, I’ve always had serious misgivings about the politics of going into someone else’s territory and photographing, though I’ve done it quite a bit. The forest, to me, is an impartial province; it is both everybody’s forest and nobody’s forest. This makes it the perfect place for a photographic encounter, a neutral territory in which personal experience and the experience of others, the forest of today and the timeless forest, can intermingle without question. Though these images are—for all intents and purposes—documentary, I seek in their amalgamation the transmission of something more metaphoric; an appeal to the imagination, a suggestion to the subconscious, a departure from the strictly realistic. Though my project is now based mainly in the Hoh and Quinalt rainforests of Washington State, I hope to expand it to include chapters in other forests.

Bio
Anna Beeke was born in Washington, DC in 1984 and resides in Brooklyn, NY. She is currently pursuing her MFA at the School of Visual Arts (class of 2013), she is a graduate of the International Center of Photography’s certificate program in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (2009), and she received her BA in English from Oberlin College (2007). Anna’s work is included in the book and exhibition: “reGeneration2: tomorrow’s photographer’s today;” she was also selected as a 2009 participant in the Eddie Adams Workshop and received the too much chocolate + Kodak film grant in 2010. Anna’s work has been exhibited internationally at galleries including ClampArt and the Aperture Foundation in NYC, the Musee de L’Elysee in Switzerland, the Michaelis School of Fine Art in South Africa, FAVA Gallery in Ohio, and at festivals such as Recontres d’Arles, the Flash Forward Festival, and the Pingyao International Photography Festival, and the Rencontres Internationales de la Photo de Fes. Website.

Tema Stauffer: 2012 WIP–LTI/Lightside Individual Project Grant Recipient

 

Paterson
Paterson is a documentary series of street portraits depicting residents of Paterson, New Jersey during the years following the economic crisis in 2008. Paterson is a historic city near the Great Falls of the Passaic River, once prosperous from its mills and silk manufacturing industry. Founded in 1791 by Alexander Hamilton and others and envisioned as the nation’s first planned industrial city, Paterson offered jobs and opportunity to an immigrant labor force in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and it was a stop on the Underground Railroad. The city is the setting of two John Updike novels and one by Junot Diaz, and has inspired the poetry of William Carlos Williams and Allen Ginsberg, as well as the architectural photography of George Tice. The third largest city in New Jersey, Paterson began to decline economically during the 1960s and 70s, and has continued to face high rates of unemployment since the recession. Downtown Paterson is lined with dollar stores, barbershops, beauty salons, bakeries, bars, churches, temples, and clinics for addicts in recovery. While its downtown streets are bustling, these streets are also a place of visible struggle and desperation.

The portraits focus on the self-expression of working-class and economically marginalized Americans of the diverse racial and ethnic groups comprising Paterson’s population. Shot in natural light on the streets with a medium-format camera, each image explores the psychology of an individual who reveals him or herself willingly to the camera’s gaze. The minimal backgrounds suggest the urban environments these subjects occupy; however, these straightforward, realist, and classically composed photographs concentrate on faces and the depth of human experience that is spoken through them.

The medium of photography has historically – and notably through seminal work made during the Great Depression – represented Americans struggling with economic hardship and alienation, and it is this socially engaged and humanistic tradition that has deeply influenced the creation of this work. The portraits of the residents of Paterson contribute to a contemporary dialogue about the current economic reality and the experiences of Americans who exist on our ever-widening margins.

Bio
Tema Stauffer is a photographer based in Brooklyn whose work has been exhibited at Jen Bekman Gallery and Daniel Cooney Fine Art Gallery in New York, as well as galleries and institutions nationally and internationally, including a survey of Contemporary U.S. Photography at the Houston Fotofest 2010 Biennial. She graduated from Oberlin College in 1995 and received a Master’s Degree in Photography from The University of Illinois at Chicago in 1998. She teaches at the School at ICP, Ramapo College, and the College of Staten Island, and she has taught art courses at William Paterson University and a photography workshop at Toxico Cultura in Mexico City. She is also a curator and writer for Culturehall, an online resource for contemporary art, and contributes writing on contemporary photography to various arts publications. In 2010, she received an AOL 25 for 25 Award for innovation in the arts. Currently, she is a finalist for the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2013 through the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. See more here.

 

Cristina de Middel: 2011 WIP–LTI/Lightside Materials Grant Recipient

 

Afronauts
In 1964, still living the dream of their recently gained independence, Zambia started a space program in hopes of catching up with the USA and the Soviet Union. Their goal was to send the first African astronaut to the moon. Only a few optimists supported the project started by a schoolteacher named Edward Makuka. The financial aid never came and the heroic initiative turned into an exotic episode in African history, surrounded by wars, violence, droughts and hunger. As a self-proclaimed photojournalist, Middel is attracted to the eccentric lines of story telling, often avoiding clichés and overworked ideas. Her practice respects photographic ‘truth’ without allowing it to limit her approach, which is to push viewers to analyze patterns in stories we consume and real. 

Bio
Cristina de Middel (Spain, 1975) is a freelance photographer based in London. She works for newspapers and for NGO´s such as Doctors Without Borders and the Spanish Red Cross. Recent awards include the Spanish National Photojournalism Award Juan Cancelo, and a special mention at the New Fnac Photographic Talent Competition.  

She combines her documentary assignments with more personal projects. In her “B-side” work, Cristina deliberately asks the audience to question the language and the veracity of photography as a document by playing with reconstructions that blur the border between reality and fiction. See more here.

Brea Souders: 2011 WIP–LTI/Lightside Materials Grant Recipient

 

Humble Arts Foundation and Women in Photography are delighted to announce Brea Souders as the 2011 WIP–LTI/Lightside Materials Grant recipient. The $1,000 grant will support a new series of photographs that examine her European ancestry.

As an American with typically mixed bloodlines, I started this project to explore the many places in Europe where I have ancestry and their influence on me as an artist and a person. I created the very first photograph in this series in Italy in May, 2010, titled Sunburn in Naples. This image encapsulated my feelings – a desire to own my Italian ancestral roots, to be wholly a part of something, but an inability to do so. The Neapolitan sun burned the Irish skin that I inherited from my father’s father. Upon my return home I continued my work, creating images that reflect my research of Christianity, art history, European history, family traditions and my desire to connect all of the pieces together into one unified whole.

I recently completed a long residency in France, where I continued this project with a focus on the experience of living as a foreigner in a place where I have ancestry. The images created in France have taken a looser and more personal turn, with special attention to my own interaction with the French landscape and with objects that I found along the way. The images speak to sudden feelings of freedom, curiosity and transformation, and to a world that became larger, less static and more confounding. The resulting photographs reflect a shift that took place within me as a result of spending time in my ancestral country, France.

Bio
Brea Souders was born in Frederick, Maryland, and studied photography at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Her work has been exhibited and screened at institutions such as Abrons Arts Center, Jack the Pelican Presents, and Affirmation Arts in New York City; the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the American University Museum, Washington, D.C; and at festivals including the New York Photo Festival; PhotoIreland in Dublin; the Singapore International Photography Festival, and Head On in Sydney, Australia. Her work has been supported by the Camac Art Centre and Fondation Ténot, Marnay-sur-Seine, France; The Millay Colony of the Arts, Austerlitz, NY and the Camera Club of New York.

Selected publications and clients include: New York Magazine, Gar-de, Vogue Paris, Real Simple, Dear Dave, Canteen, Warner Brothers Records, and Feltrinelli Publishing House. Brea lives and works in New York City. See more here.

Debbie Grossman

 
Jessie Evans-Whinery, homesteader, with her wife Edith Evans-Whinery and their baby.

Jessie Evans-Whinery, homesteader, with her wife Edith Evans-Whinery and their baby.


My Pie Town
My Pie Town reworks and re-imagines a body of images originally photographed by Russell Lee for the United States Farm Security Administration in 1940. Using Photoshop to modify Lee’s pictures, I have created an imaginary, parallel world – a Pie Town populated exclusively by women. In some of my revisions, I have taken male bodies and rendered them to look like masculine women; in others, I have taken pairs of women, shifted their distance and body language, and brought them closer to create a sense of intimacy. In some of the pictures I have created women so masculine, or so ambiguously gendered, that they may not, for some viewers, clearly read as one gender or the other. I’ve also left a few images untouched, allowing for another dimension of re-reading Lee’s work.

Because the images of Lee’s time in Pie Town are available in high resolution form from the Library of Congress, I was able to get close to Lee’s images on a pixel level. For me, working with photographs and editing them so closely in Photoshop is a kind of an intimate act. Zooming in and carving a feminine jaw out of a masculine one, or manipulating the touch of one woman’s hand on another’s shoulder is a way for me to access and merge my desire with figures which would have otherwise remained frozen in time.  I’ve begun to think of Photoshop itself as my medium – I’m fascinated by the fact that it shares qualities with both photography and drawing. This work creates something that reads as a photograph, and is infinitely reproducible like a photograph, but at the same time depends heavily upon the intervention of my hand.

Pie Town, New Mexico. A community settled by about 200 migrant Texas and Oklahoma farmers who filed homestead claims. Scene on a homesteader's farm.

Pie Town, New Mexico. A community settled by about 200 migrant Texas and Oklahoma farmers who filed homestead claims. Scene on a homesteader's farm.

Main Street, Pie Town

Main Street, Pie Town

The Fae and Doris Caudill family eating dinner in their dugout.

The Fae and Doris Caudill family eating dinner in their dugout.

Ann Hesse, homesteader.

Ann Hesse, homesteader.

Couple at community meeting.

Couple at community meeting.

Mildred Anthony, standing by mounted animals which she killed.

Mildred Anthony, standing by mounted animals which she killed.

Couple at squaredance.

Couple at squaredance.

Swing your partner squaredance.

Swing your partner squaredance.

Nell Leathers, homesteader, shooting hawks which have been carrying away her chickens.

Nell Leathers, homesteader, shooting hawks which have been carrying away her chickens.

Virginia Norris with homegrown cabbage, one of the many vegetables which the homesteaders grow in abundance.

Virginia Norris with homegrown cabbage, one of the many vegetables which the homesteaders grow in abundance.

Ruth Leonard secures a calf in her pasture.

Ruth Leonard secures a calf in her pasture.

Garden adjacent to the dugout home of Jessie and Edith Evans-Whinery.

Garden adjacent to the dugout home of Jessie and Edith Evans-Whinery.

Jean Norris and wife Virginia Norris, homesteaders and town founders.

Jean Norris and wife Virginia Norris, homesteaders and town founders.

Picture of Jean Norris’ old farm home in Oklahoma, hanging in the Norris living room.

Picture of Jean Norris’ old farm home in Oklahoma, hanging in the Norris living room.

Bio
Debbie Grossman is interested in playing with time, re-imagining history, and reviving archival images and documents. Shereceived an MFA in Photography, Video, and Related Media from the School of Visual Arts, where she won the Paula Rhodes Memorial Prize, and holds a BA in Women’s Studies and Art History from Barnard College. In 2011, she will participate in the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace program. Debbie is also a Senior Editor at Popular Photography Magazine, where she is the resident expert on image editing software and technique. Her project “My Pie Town” is represented by the Julie Saul Gallery in New York. website.

Victoria Hely-Hutchinson

 
Eton College Chapel

Eton College Chapel


Public School
‘Public School’ is an ongoing exploration into the lives of children between the ages of 7 and 18 at elite boarding schools across England. Steeped in tradition and ritual, the schools encourage the adoption of an ideal model of English civility, often at the expense of individuality. These images document the order, control and rigidity of a wellmaintained institution. But behind the glossy facade there is a creeping tension between the antiquated and modern, adolescence and adulthood, labour and conservative.

Headmaster’s Classroom

Headmaster’s Classroom

Fives

Fives

Benenden

Benenden

Library

Library

Oliver

Oliver

Alexandra

Alexandra

Stowe

Stowe

Music Room

Music Room

Chapel

Chapel

Crossing Slough

Crossing Slough

Headmaster

Headmaster

Bio
Victoria Hely-Hutchinson is a British photographer based in Brooklyn, NY. Her work has been commissioned by The New York Times Magazine, Dazed and Confused and Burberry and exhibited at Sasha Wolf Gallery and Aperture in New York. She is currently a post-graduate student in photography at Yale. website.

Carson Fisk-Vittori

 
Seaside, 2008

Seaside, 2008


Fisk-Vittori creates work about everyday objects and environments. Arrangements of objects are presented as photographs and installations that question the function, meaning, and history surrounding that object and display. The arrangements feature both deliberate and casual formation that satirize advertisements and lifestyle magazines. Her interest lies in the relationship between art and design, and the parallel between the gallery and ordinary spaces such as the living room. The plant life and natural elements in her work emphasize an awkward relationship between the natural and human-constructed worlds. Familiar objects are presented in situations that reveal material essence and create new visual conversations

Seeds, 2008

Seeds, 2008

Computers, 2010

Computers, 2010

Composition with Dandelions, 2010

Composition with Dandelions, 2010

Summer Set, 2010

Summer Set, 2010

Nude, 2010

Nude, 2010

Deleted Scenes, 2009

Deleted Scenes, 2009

Curtain, 2009

Curtain, 2009

Venus Ad, 2009

Venus Ad, 2009

Dirty Feet, 2009

Dirty Feet, 2009

Sunset, 2008

Sunset, 2008

Portal, 2007

Portal, 2007

Bio
Carson Fisk-Vittori (b. 1987) was born in Austin, Texas. She received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2009 in Interdisciplinary Studies. Her current obsessions include floral arrangement and food packaging. She has been included in group exhibitions nationally. website.

Kristine Potter

 
Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line


The Gray Line
Presented in conjunction with Daniel Cooney Fine Art

“The Gray Line,” Kristine Potter’s first solo exhibition at Daniel Cooney Fine Art, culls from images made during the last four years as she has been mining her complex feelings toward the military, a subject which she has long, familial connection. For many generations most of the men in her family earned their living and defined their purpose as military officers. Growing up in this military culture, Potter’s childhood was saturated with orderliness, hierarchy, patriotism and a certain knowledge of “the enemy”. Being a child (and adult) interested in nuance, culture, progressive ideas and non-conformity, she was often at odds with the governing forces in her life.  She says of her childhood, “True respect aside, I struggled to understand war and how one could take command toengage… I wanted to understand the organization of violence and power, and I yearned tohumanize the tough exteriors of these men against all of the anxieties I felt when thinking of their jobs and of their structure.”

Despite the long line of military men in Potter’s family, her generation has declined to enroll, ending the long lineage.

Continuing her interest in large format portraiture, Kristine has garnered access to West Point Military Academy, an Academy that has trained a number of men in her family and has produced a greater number of high-ranking officers and politicians than any other U.S. military academy. She uses a view camera to produce images of cadets that explore ideas about masculinity, expectation, allegiance, sexuality, vulnerability and death, catching them before they are fully formed soldiers and officers. While traditional portraiture of soldiers serves to show their achievements, excellence and their sense of duty, Potter’s images describe the complicated psychologies under their developing personas. She extracts something uniquely emotional about each cadet while also imposing upon the images certain reservations and attractions she has about soldiers in training. The resulting images balance between the languages of the documentary and of the staged with an effect that provides a compelling counterweight to live-feed coverage of our wars and of traditional military portraiture.

Untitled, 2009 From The Gray Line

Untitled, 2009 From The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2005, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2005, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2010, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2010, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2010, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2010, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Untitled 2009, from The Gray Line

Bio
Kristine Potter was born in Dallas, Texas in 1977. She earned both a BFA in Photography and a BA in Art History at the University of Georgia in 2000. From 2000 – 2003 Kristine lived and worked as a professional printer in Paris, France. In 2005 she earned her MFA in Photography from Yale University. Potter’s work has been exhibited in Paris, New York City, Miami, Atlanta and Raleigh, NC. She will be having her first major solo exhibition with Daniel Cooney Fine Art in November 2010.  website.

Tiana Markova-Gold: 2010 WIP-LTI/Lightside Individual Materials Grant Recipient

 

Isolation, Vulnerability and Courage: Sex Workers in Macedonia
In Macedonia, as throughout the world, sex workers are pushed to the margins of society by a combination of prejudice, discrimination, and violence. Sex workers inhabit a particularly vulnerable position in Macedonian society, facing harassment and violence not only from their clients and pimps, but also from law enforcement officials and other authorities. These abuses include physical violence, illegal detention, compulsory testing for sexually transmitted diseases, and rape, which are compounded by substandard enforcement of law and lack of access to health and support services.  Adding to these challenges are the risks of HIV/AIDS and other STDs, drug addiction, a hostile public attitude, and mass-media harassment. Because of the tremendous negative stigma connected to prostitution in Macedonia, most sex workers are living double lives, concealing the fact that they are sex workers from their families and the communities in which they live. A disproportionate number of street-based sex workers, those most vulnerable, are members of the Roma community, Macedonia’s most harshly discriminated against ethnic minority group. Gay and transgender sex workers are often targeted and further marginalized because of their sexual or gender orientation.

Building upon my previous long-term projects documenting the lives of sex workers in New York City, I spent several weeks in the spring of 2010 photographing and recording the stories of sex workers in Macedonia. I collaborated closely with Healthy Options Project Skopje (HOPS) to create the body of work, spending many days at their drop-in center, joining the outreach team in the streets and in the Roma community, and visiting sex workers in their homes. I recorded hours of audio interviews and conversations with the people I photographed, as well as the sounds of the streets and rooms where they live and work. Because of the sensitivity of the topic and the previous negative exposure sex workers have suffered in Macedonian media, it was essential to me to not only work closely with HOPS, but also to discuss the project directly with the sex workers themselves. Almost all of the people I photographed in Macedonia were eager to tell their stories but asked that I conceal their identities from the viewer; they wanted to be seen and heard but were terrified of being exposed. Theirs are stories of fear, isolation and vulnerability, but also of survival and courage in the face of relentless abuse and alienation.

Bio
Tiana Markova-Gold is a freelance documentary photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. She received a New York Times Scholarship to attend the full-time Photojournalism Program at the International Center of Photography in 2006-07. She has traveled extensively, documenting social issues with a particular focus on women and girls.  Tiana’s photographs have been recognized in numerous photography contests including Pictures of the Year International, New York Photo Awards, PDN Photo Annual, American Photography and the International Photography Awards.  Her work has been included in exhibitions at Sasha Wolf gallery, New York Photo Festival, HOST gallery in London, England and the Lumix Festival of Young Photojournalism in Hannover, Germany.

Since the spring of 2007, Tiana has been working on an in-depth project about the lives of women in prostitution in New York City. In January 2009 she traveled throughout Asia on a photography fellowship from the Johnson & Johnson Foundation, photographing social services projects in nine countries across the region. In April and May 2009 she traveled to Nigeria and Brasil as the recipient of a fellowship from Global Fund for Children and the Nike Foundation, documenting the work of several local organizations whose aim is to empower, protect and educate adolescent girls and young women. She is a 2010 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow in Photography and 2010 recipient, with writer Sarah Dohrmann, of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University for If You Smoke Cigarettes in Public You Are a Prostitute: Women and Prostitution in Morocco. website 

We are proud to announce that the 2010 WIP-LTI/Lightside Individual Materials Grant, providing $1000 in artists choice of Kodak materials has been awarded to Tiana Markova-Gold for her project documenting social issues surrounding sex workers in Macedonia.

Housed

 
Catherine Opie | Self-portrait/Cutting, 1993

Catherine Opie | Self-portrait/Cutting, 1993


Women in Photography is pleased to present a selection of artists in conjunction with the exhibition Housed running at The Alice Austen House Museum from July 1 – September 5, 2010.

This group show marks the curatorial debut of artists Joseph Maida and Katie Murray.

Housed draws from Maida and Murray’s ongoing dialog with fellow photographers and video artists who explore fresh approaches to the subject matter of home. The individuals included in this exhibition are successors to a generation of American artists whose photographs interpret social, cultural, and political events through the restaging of personal occurrences in suburban living rooms and backyards. While this previous generation depicts the literal stage and accompanying narratives of domestic life, the artists in Housed present a more analytical approach to the American home. Housed contextualizes the works of thirteen living artists by exhibiting them, alongside the work of Victorian-era photographer Alice Austen, in Austen’s historic home on Staten Island.

Housed includes Kathryn Parker Almanas, Alice Austen, David Deutsch, Benjamin Donaldson, Matt Ducklo, Kyle Ganson, Peter Garfield, Christopher Miner, Catherine Opie, Abby Robinson, Victoria Sambunaris, Peter Stanglmayr, Penelope Umbrico, and Jessica Watson.

For more information about the show and the Alice Austen Museum, click here.

Alice Austen | Trude & I Masked

Alice Austen | Trude & I Masked

Jessica Watson | Flounder, 2001

Jessica Watson | Flounder, 2001

Jessica Watson | Lampshade, 2006

Jessica Watson | Lampshade, 2006

Jessica Watson | Red Knives, 2006

Jessica Watson | Red Knives, 2006

Victoria Sambunaris | Untitled, Wendover, UT, 2007

Victoria Sambunaris | Untitled, Wendover, UT, 2007

Kathryn Parker Almanas | Blueberry Danish, 2006

Kathryn Parker Almanas | Blueberry Danish, 2006

Abby Robinson | Auto Works

Abby Robinson | Auto Works

Abby Robinson | Auto Works

Abby Robinson | Auto Works

Abby Robinson | Auto Works

Abby Robinson | Auto Works

Penelope Umbrico | Mirror, 2001-2

Penelope Umbrico | Mirror, 2001-2

Bio

Kathryn Parker Almanas was born in 1981 in Binghamton, NY. She earned a BFA in Photography from MassArt in 2003 and a MFA in Photography from Yale University in 2007. While at Yale, she was awarded the Schickle-Collingwood Prize; and upon receiving her MFA, she was awarded the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship to conduct research in Italy. Her work has been published in PDN’s 30 2009, 25 Under 25 Up-and-Coming American Photographers, The Photo Review, Toronto Life, American Photo, the Waterstone Review, Metropolis, Gastronomica, The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography, among others. Her work has been commissioned by Culture+Travel magazine and for a portrait of the artist for the publication, Wangechi Mutu: A Shady Promise. Almanas’ work has been exhibited in New York, Boston, Chicago, Miami, and Philadelphia. website.

Alice Austen was introduced to photography when she was 10 years old by her Uncle Oswald, who brought home an early-model dry plate camera from one of his many trips abroad. Alice showed immediate and natural ability. Through experimentation she taught herself how to operate the complex camera mechanism, judge exposure, develop the heavy glass plates, and make prints. By the time she was 18 in 1884, she was not only technically skilled but artistically accomplished as well. Alice was active, social, and well traveled. Everywhere she went, she took her camera equipment, which sometimes weighed as much as fifty pounds and often filled a steamer trunk. As a result of her desire to photograph so much of her life and the world around her, her range of subjects was extensive. In her lifetime, she created images on approximately 8,000 glass plates, of which more than 3,000 survive. Alice Austen’s work is significant because of its high quality, its range, and its level of expression that together form a beautiful visual window on 19th century America. website.

Catherine Opiewebsite.

Abby Robinson has shown her photographs in the US, Europe and Asia. Much of her work has been done in conjunction with grants from the Asian Cultural Council (1995-1996/Vietnam), the Fulbright Program (1999-2000/Sri Lanka and India), and the American Institute of Sri Lankan Studies (2004, 2005). She also received a Siskind Grant and New York Foundation of the Arts Grant in 2006. She’s had fellowships at Yaddo, MacDowell and the Virginia Center for the Creative artist colonies along with artist-in-residencies at Light Works (Syracuse, NY), Altos de Chavon (Dominican Republic) and most recently Three Shadows (Beijing). One-Person Exhibitions Include: FotoFest, Houston; H2O, Barcelona; The Workshop, Hong Kong; and Blue Sky Gallery, Portland, OR. She has written for Asian Art News and South Asian Popular Culture, is a contributor to the new Trans-Asia Photography Review, and has published a novel, The Dick and Jane based on her experiences working with a private investigator. Her photographs have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Time, Photographers International, Dear Dave, and Shots. Robinson lives and works in New York. She teaches photography at the School of Visual Arts (SVA) in Manhattan in the B.F.A. Photography and the Graphic Design & Advertising Departments. website.

Victoria Sambunaris received her MFA from Yale University in 1999. Each year, she structures her life around a photographic journey crossing the American landscape. She is currently following the US/Mexican border photographing the intersection of geology, politics and culture along the volatile international boundary. She has received fellowships from the Center for Land Use Interpretation and the Lannan Foundation. Her work is held in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Lannan Foundation. website.

Penelope Umbrico is an artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. website.

Jessica Watson received her MFA in photography from Bard College and her BA in studio art from Wellesley College. Her work has been exhibited at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockport, Maine and in New York galleries, including Larissa Goldston Gallery, Art in General, Massimo Audiello Gallery and Sean Kelly Gallery. She was a resident at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Program in 2005. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. website.

Joseph Maida has had solo exhibitions of his work at Wallspace Gallery in Manhattan and at the Nikon Salons in Tokyo and Osaka. His photographs and videos have also been included in group exhibitions at the Bronx Museum of Art, the Queens Museum of Art, Art In General, Artists Space, and PS122, and he has shown internationally at institutions including the Reina Sofia National Museum, the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, the Kunsthalle Wien, and the Pro-Arte Center, Saint Petersburg. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a recent JUSFC/National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Maida is a graduate of Columbia (B.A.) and Yale Universities (M.F.A.). website.

Katie Murray has had solo exhibitions of her work at White Columns and Jen Bekman Gallery in New York City. She has also participated in group exhibitions at venues including the International Center of Photography, the Queens Museum of Art, The Museum of the City of New York, Yale Art Gallery, Bellwether Gallery, and Kate Werble Gallery. Murray’s photographs have been featured and reviewed in New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, W Magazine, and PDN, among others. Her newest video girls in 4/4 is currently the subject of a solo exhibition at World Class Boxing in Miami. Murray is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts (B.F.A.) and Yale University (M.F.A.). website.

Magda Biernat

 
Guest room, Maasai Mara, Kenya. 2007

Guest room, Maasai Mara, Kenya. 2007


Inhabited
Space, light, color and the relationship of elements to each other are the key components of my photographs. Guided by an interest in urbanism and habitation, I focus my work on the built environment and its influence on global societies.

“Inhabited” is the result of my explorations into the world’s private and public spaces searching for differences and commonalities. Between 2007 and 2008 I spent a year traveling around the world, taking photographs across 17 countries.

The world’s cultures may be very different, but when seen through a consistent lens in terms of simple geometry, the complexities of cultural variation fall away. Here I turn my camera onto the ordinary details of everyday life, past the complexities of race, religion or cultural differences and onto the similarities of the mundane. I look into the quiet spaces where people sleep, wait, or work. My first priority was to examine the design and atmosphere of culturally diverse spaces and as I did so I saw beyond diversity to a consistency in the way we lead our lives.

The interiors of the rooms I’ve shot serve the same purpose no matter where they are found. Stripped of obvious cultural references and detached from their surroundings, they gain a kind of disorienting universality. The rooms are unoccupied but on closer inspection, items like a crumpled pillow or a half full bottle of water imply the human presence. By carefully composing each frame and eliminating the people who otherwise would help distinguish the place geographically, I wanted the spaces to become anonymous. This anonymity forces the viewer to imagine, “Who lives here? What do they do?” and most importantly, briefly switch places with the absent occupants and ask, “Could this be me?”

Mosquito Net, Aurangabad, India. 2007

Mosquito Net, Aurangabad, India. 2007

Red T-shirt, Mumbai, India. 2007

Red T-shirt, Mumbai, India. 2007

Youth Hostel, Aurangabad, India. 2007

Youth Hostel, Aurangabad, India. 2007

Waiting room, Alishan, Taiwan. 2008

Waiting room, Alishan, Taiwan. 2008

Maiboxes, Kolkata, India. 2007

Maiboxes, Kolkata, India. 2007

Maori Garage, Rotorua, New Zealand. 2008

Maori Garage, Rotorua, New Zealand. 2008

Salvation Army Red Shield Hostel, Mumbai, India. 2007

Salvation Army Red Shield Hostel, Mumbai, India. 2007

Chinese Temple, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 2008

Chinese Temple, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 2008

Tea Room, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 2008

Tea Room, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 2008

Water Department Office, Kekri, India. 2007

Water Department Office, Kekri, India. 2007

Bio
Magda Biernat was born in Poznan, Poland. She obtained a MA Degree in Marketing and Management from the Adam Mickiewicz University and a BA degree in Photography from Wielkopolska School of Photography. She spent a year abroad during college studying at the Katholieke Universiteit of Leuven, Belgium.

She moved to the United States in 2002, first settling down in Seattle, WA, then moving to New York, NY two years later. She continued perusing her love of photography by working in different photography related positions.

After moving to New York, she started working for the worldwide photographers cooperative, Magnum Photos, where she acquired experience in running a photography business. In the meantime she continued working as a freelance photographer and on her personal projects.

Magda Biernat was introduced to the field of Architectural Photography when she took a workshop with Norman McGrath at the Maine Photographic Workshops. Not longer after, she started assisting Mr. McGrath on different architectural jobs.

To better understand the world of architecture and design in 2005 Magda began working at Metropolis Magazine as a Freelance Photo Editor. There she had the opportunity to meet and work with many great photographers working in this field.

Magda Biernat resides and works in New York. website.

S. Billie Mandle

 
Untitled HF

Untitled HF


Reconciliation
In this series I photograph confessionals, the small rooms found in Catholic churches where people confess their sins. I interpret the spaces from the perspective of the individual, focusing on the personal experience of confession and the interiority of faith. I was raised Catholic and the traditions of these rooms are familiar to me. Now photographing the confessional is a type of ritual; I use a large format camera and available light, lifting the curtain of the confessionals, just as I lift the dark cloth of the camera.

Confessionals are places of contradiction, light and darkness, corporeality and transcendence; people confess their sins and ask for grace surrounded by the trace of past confessions. I use these visual and conceptual oppositions to question the interdependence between tangible doctrine and intangible beliefs; I am interested in the way the architecture of the confessional gives form to the abstract idea of penance. In making these images I approach the confessionals as metaphorical spaces—-rooms that suggest the paradoxes of faith and forgiveness.

Untitled C

Untitled C

Untitled PA

Untitled PA

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Untitled M

Untitled M

Untitled HC

Untitled HC

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Untitled E

Untitled ST

Untitled ST

Untitled GC

Untitled GC

Untitled H

Untitled H

Bio
I was born in 1978 and grew up in Connecticut and California. I received a BA in Biology and English from Williams College in 2000 and an MFA from the Massachusetts College of Art in 2008. My work has been exhibited in Boston and New York and in 2009 I was awarded an individual artist TIER grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council/NYSCA. I teach photography at the Massachusetts College of Art and the International Center of Photography.  website.

Allison Davies

 
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OUTERLAND

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Bio
Since completing her photography MFA at Yale in the late nineties, Davies has assumed many guises. Between intermittent assignments as an undercover private investigator for a Manhattan law firm, she has been quietly slipping away from a career fraught with risk to make landscape photographs and ambiguous self-portraits of haunting beauty.

In Outerland, her debut collaboration with Charles Lane Press, Davies reveals for the first time her personal work of more than a decade. Portraying herself as a solitary wanderer in the spectacular vistas of alien worlds, she appears only obliquely in her images, veiled in a spacesuit of her own design.  As Davies traverses the beautiful but deadly topography of Outerland, her purpose is unclear. What is the meaning of the strange insignia on her suit? Are the instruments she carries with her – and with which she subtly alters the landscape – for science or survival? Where exactly is Outerland, if it is not in fact a harsh and dystopian vision of our own planet deep in the future? Presented without text or explanation of any kind, and with only a handful of mysterious symbols to help us orient ourselves in Davies’ imagined cosmos, Outerland offers a compelling new perspective on self-portraiture within the continuum of modern landscape photography.

Outerland is the second book in Charles Lane Press’ carefully curated, one-a-year titles.  Outerland was edited by photographer Richard Renaldi and consists of 65 full color plates. www.charleslanepress.com