Claire Beckett

 
Above Medina Jabal Town, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009

Above Medina Jabal Town, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009


Simulating Iraq
My studio practice focuses on conceptually driven large-format photography. I am particularly interested in photographic representation across the themes of difference, cultural mimesis and gender. These ideas are reflected in my current project, Simulating Iraq, which deals with American military training for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Although the concepts I explore in this series are specific to the present political and cultural climate, the project springs from a decade-long interest in using photography to engage critically with the world in which I live. A beautiful or carefully considered image is never enough. I seek to create images that are visually compelling but also explore themes that have personal resonance. Often my ideas stem from politics and news stories, not so much for an ideological reason, but because they move me deeply.

The images in Simulating Iraq are made on military bases within the U.S., in fabricated environments that replicate the places where American troops are deployed. These pictures are about how we as Americans interact with and understand our place in the world. To me, the places that I photograph take on a kind of amalgamated identity, not American, not Iraqi, not Afghani, not Somali, but something entirely different. While the planners of these facilities may understand them as replications of specific places—say Fallujah, Iraq or Helmond Provence, Afghanistan—I understand them as spaces of their own. The setting depicted here is that of the “Other,” of the non-White, non-Western, non-Christian, non-Democratic. It is the place of terrorists and bad guys of all stripes, a place in need of order, of discipline, of salvation.

Among the photographs are images of pseudo-Islamic architecture, sweeping desert vistas evoking unknown adventure, and portraits of those pretending to be villagers in an occupied land or terrorists at war against the Americans. There are American soldiers and Marines, combat veterans who now play the roles of the very jihadis that they previously battled in real life. In other pictures, immigrants from Afghanistan, some who have fled to the U.S. as refugees, now role-play as themselves, or rather as surreal versions of their former selves. I am interested in understanding the experience of the people who spend time here. What does it feel like for a young soldier to have their first encounter with profound cultural difference in this environment? What is the experience of a refugee, or of a veteran suffering from PTSD, when reenacting the context of their real life trauma? Although these spaces are meant as imitations of reality, what exists here is significant in its own right.

Army Specialist Gary McCorkle playing the role of “Jibril Ihsan Hamal,” a key member of the leading terrorist group in town, Islamic Army of Iraq, with an IED, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009

Army Specialist Gary McCorkle playing the role of “Jibril Ihsan Hamal,” a key member of the leading terrorist group in town, Islamic Army of Iraq, with an IED, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2009

Civilian Afghan-American Women role playing as Afghan villagers during a Marine Corps Training, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Civilian Afghan-American Women role playing as Afghan villagers during a Marine Corps Training, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Marine Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens playing the role of a Taliban fighter, Landing Zone Owl, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Marine Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens playing the role of a Taliban fighter, Landing Zone Owl, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA 2009

Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA 2009

Army Specialist Jake Morash playing the role of Iraqi “Kahtan Abban Issa,”  an anti-American IED maker, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

Army Specialist Jake Morash playing the role of Iraqi “Kahtan Abban Issa,”  an anti-American IED maker, Medina Wasl Village, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

Sharq Village Market, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

Sharq Village Market, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, CA, 2008

Marines Sargent John Sexon, Lance Corporal Cameron Stark and Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens roleplaying as Taliban fighters, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Marines Sargent John Sexon, Lance Corporal Cameron Stark and Lance Corporal Joshua Stevens roleplaying as Taliban fighters, Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, CA, 2009

Civilian Joshua Osborne playing the role of an Iraqi civilian, Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Civilian Joshua Osborne playing the role of an Iraqi civilian, Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Marine Lance Corporal Nicole Camala Veen playing the role of an Iraqi nurse in the town of Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Marine Lance Corporal Nicole Camala Veen playing the role of an Iraqi nurse in the town of Wadi Al-Sahara, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, CA, 2008

Bio
Born and raised in Chicago, Claire Beckett earned a BA in Anthropology at Kenyon College. She then worked as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Benin, West Africa, before going on to earn an MFA in Photography at Mass College of Art + Design.

Claire Beckett is represented by Carroll and Sons Gallery in Boston. Her photographs have been featured in solo exhibitions at Carroll and Sons, Bernard Toale Gallery and the University of Rhode Island, and a solo show is forthcoming at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at Mass MoCA, the Chelsea Museum of Art, the Haggerty Museum, the Photographic Resource Center, Hendershot Gallery, Simmons College, FOTODOK (NL), and the Noorderlicht Festival (NL), among others. She is a recipient of an Artadia Award, a Blanche Coleman Award, and a Massachusetts Cultural Council Grant.

Claire Beckett resides in Boston, where she divides her time between her life as an artist and her life as a photography professor. For the 2011-2012 academic year, she is a full-time visiting faculty member in photography at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. website